Nokia Lumia 900 teardown reveals mediocre hardware

By on April 4, 2012 at 9:00 PM.

Nokia Lumia 900 teardown reveals mediocre hardware

Nokia and Microsoft are betting big on the Lumia 900, hoping the device will help make a name for Windows Phone in the United States. The handset will be exclusively offered by AT&T for a mere $99.99 with a new two-year agreement on April 8th. TechRepublic on Tuesday cracked open the device and examined its internal components. The conclusion: mediocre hardware is the reasons for its low price. With almost every other competing smartphone offering dual-core or quad-core processors, Nokia instead chose a single-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S2 chipset clocked at 1.4 GHz. The Lumia has a smaller battery, lower resolution display and less RAM than most of its competitors as well. The handset is also thicker and heavier than most, although it has a good build quality according to the site. Despite these shortcomings, Nokia’s Lumia 900 is a terrific smartphone that gives Windows Phone its best shot yet to succeed. More →

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New iPad teardown now underway at iFixit [updated]

By on March 15, 2012 at 11:54 AM.

New iPad teardown now underway at iFixit [updated]

Well-known gadget repair company iFixit made its way to Australia on Thursday in order to be among the first to procure a new Apple iPad. Following a midnight launch at one Australian retailer, iFixit has managed to obtain the highly sought-after tablet and is already in the process of performing one of its famous teardowns. Gadget fans and investors alike will be watching closely as the firm reveals the manufacturers behind many of the key components found within the new tablet, and we’ll update this post as details emerge.

UPDATE: iFixit believes that the LCD panel in the iPad it is currently disassembling was manufactured by Samsung. Earlier reports stated that Samsung is the sole manufacturer of Apple’s new 9.7-inch Retina Displays, while a subsequent report claimed LG Display is also supplying panels for the new iPad. IFixit also states that the new iPad includes a 11,560 mAh battery. More →

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Samsung takes another page from Apple’s playbook: increase margins

By on February 7, 2012 at 10:20 AM.

Samsung takes another page from Apple’s playbook: increase margins

Apple has argued on multiple occasions that Samsung builds mobile products that “blatantly imitate the appearance of Apple’s products to capitalize on Apple’s success.” Courts seem to disagree for the most part, with only a pair of injunctions having been issued despite dozens of complaints Apple has filed around the world. There are some areas where Samsung does seem to take pages out of Apple’s playbook, however — Samsung’s new anti-iPhone ad strategy is somewhat reminiscent of Apple’s famous “I’m a Mac” campaign, for example — and market research firm Allied Business Intelligence may have uncovered another one this week. Read on for more. More →

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Barnes & Noble Nook Tablet harder to repair than Kindle Fire, teardown shows

By on November 21, 2011 at 9:45 PM.

Barnes & Noble Nook Tablet harder to repair than Kindle Fire, teardown shows

The team at iFixit recently tore open Barnes & Noble’s brand new Nook Tablet to get a closer look at its inner workings see how they compare to Amazon’s Kindle Fire. The group found that the Nook Tablet is powered by a dual-core TI OMAP 4 processor clocked at 1GHz, and it has 1GB of RAM and 16GB of internal SanDisk storage. It also has a 4,000 mAh battery under the hood that’s rated for up to 11.5 hours of reading time, 3.5 hours longer than the previous generation Nook Color device. The Nook Tablet received a repairability score of 6 out of 10 points, which is worse than the Kindle Fire’s 8/10 score. The LCD can be easily replaced because it isn’t fused to the bezel, however one would need to remove the motherboard in order to replace the battery, and there are “excessive amounts of adhesive” and even hidden screws that made the teardown a bit more tedious than usual. More →

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Teardown reveals $199 Kindle Fire costs $201.70 to build

By on November 18, 2011 at 10:45 PM.

Teardown reveals $199 Kindle Fire costs $201.70 to build

A recent teardown of Amazon’s new Kindle Fire tablet reveals that the company is likely selling its new Android-powered slate at a loss. Market research and intelligence firm IHS iSuppli on Friday published its findings after disassembling the new Amazon Kindle Fire tablet and examining its components. Following its analysis, the firm determined that Amazon’s Build of Materials cost is $185.60, and its total cost including manufacturing-related fees is $201.70 per Kindle Fire. Prior to obtaining and disassembling the tablet, IHS had estimated its parts and manufacturing costs to be $209.63 per unit combined. Read on for more. More →

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Amazon Kindle Fire gets torn open, repairs deemed simple [video]

By on November 18, 2011 at 2:00 PM.

Amazon Kindle Fire gets torn open, repairs deemed simple [video]

The group at iFixit recently tore open the Amazon Kindle Fire to get a good look at its hardware. The group discovered that the device is powered by a Texas Instruments OMAP 4430 processor clocked at 1GHz that is paired with an older Texas Instruments WL1270B 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi chip. Overall, the Kindle Fire didn’t have too many complicated parts, which resulted in a solid 8/10 repairability score from iFixit. The team said its rear case is easy to take off, users only need a regular screw driver to open the tablet, and the LCD isn’t fused to its the glass cover, which means it should be fairly easy to replace if it breaks. Unfortunately, however, the glass pane is fused to the bezel, and it will require a heat gun to separate the components. A video from DirectFix, another site that tore apart the Kindle Fire and examined its innards, follows after the break. More →

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iFixit reveals inner workings of iPhone 4S in new teardown

By on October 13, 2011 at 7:30 PM.

iFixit reveals inner workings of iPhone 4S in new teardown

The crew at iFixit has given the iPhone 4S its proper tear-down, revealing the phone’s inner workings and hardware. iFixit noticed that the battery offers an extra 0.5 WHrs over the one found in the iPhone 4, which is likely the reason Apple is able to advertise an additional 1-hour of 3G talk time on the iPhone 4S compared to its predecessor. The phone is equipped with a Qualcomm RTR8605 radio, an Avago ACPM-7181 power amplifier and of course a dual-core 1GHz Apple A5 processor, which has been downclocked to 800MHz. Be sure to hit the jump for a few more images of the iPhone 4S teardown. Deliveries of Apple’s new smartphone begin on Friday, and in the meantime be sure to check out our hands-on with the iPhone 4S. More →

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Apple maintains big margins on iPhone 4S according to UBM analysis

By on October 6, 2011 at 7:00 AM.

Apple maintains big margins on iPhone 4S according to UBM analysis

Apple is looking at another big-margin device launch next week when the tech giant’s fifth-generation iPhone finally hits store shelves on October 14th. Market research and intelligence firm UBM TechInsights on Wednesday estimated that Apple’s 32GB iPhone 4S carries a materials cost of $203 per handset for the Cupertino-based company. UBM arrived at that number by using component costs from its iPhone 4 teardown as a base and then making slight adjustments for known changes in iPhone 4S components, such as the new A5 processor. Apple’s Canadian website states that the MSRP for its iPhone 4S starts at $649 (CAD, though Apple’s pricing in Canada and the U.S. are aligned in most cases), so presuming the company will stay true to form and add $100 to the MSRP of the 32GB model, Apple is looking at a margin of roughly $546 when taking only build of materials (BOM) into account. After additional expenses, however, Apple still looks to have another solid money-maker on its hands. UBM TechInsights’ full press release follows below. More →

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Samsung Galaxy S II teardown reveals major redesign, cutting-edge tech

By on July 8, 2011 at 4:35 PM.

Samsung Galaxy S II teardown reveals major redesign, cutting-edge tech

As part of its new Teardown Research Service, market research firm ABI Research has torn Samsung’s Galaxy S II apart in order to analyze and test the components Samsung used to build its latest flagship device. “If you are looking to keep up with the latest technology in 2011, the Galaxy S II is a good place to start,” ABI Research’s report states, listing the device’s major changes compared to the original Galaxy S as including the Exynos dual-core processor, a new single-packaged multi-band multi-mode radio from RFMD, a new CMOS-based antenna switch and a lower-power XMM6260 cellular chipset from Infineon. “Samsung started from scratch with this phone: almost every component is new,” ABI Research vice president of engineering James Mielke said in a statement. “Its application processor is the most powerful on the market at present. It is the first to use the Samsung Exynos 4210 dual-core application processor (a competitor to NVIDIA’s dual-core Tegra 2). The name Exynos combines Greek words for ‘smart’ and ‘green,’ indicating Samsung’s energy-efficiency goals for the design.” Mielke concludes, ““Samsung took many risks by combining all these new technologies into one phone. But ABI Research believes those risks will pay off; the Galaxy S II sets a new benchmark for almost every category on which a smartphone is measured.” More →

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Apple’s new iMac gets torn open; same LG display spotted

By on May 4, 2011 at 9:11 PM.

Apple’s new iMac gets torn open; same LG display spotted

The crew over at iFixit — torx screw drivers in hand – just stripped down one of Apple’s brand new 21.5 inch Sandy Bridge iMacs to give us a look at its guts. There aren’t too many surprises in store: the computer uses the same LG display found in the last generation of iMacs, and iFixit was pleased to find that Apple used an appropriate amount of thermal paste on the CPU and GPU — a “happy departure from the gobs” Cupertino put on the new MacBook Pro. The RAM, hard drive, and optical drive can be swapped out easily, too; you’ll just have to remove the LCD in order to do so. iFixit gave the new iMac a 7 out of 10 “repairability score,” as most of the hardware was easy to access. The team’s biggest complaint was with the need to remove the logic board in order to clean the LCD after reassembling the computer. Hit the jump for a few more images of the teardown. More →

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BlackBerry PlayBook gets iFixit tear-down

By on April 19, 2011 at 7:33 PM.

BlackBerry PlayBook gets iFixit tear-down

The team over at iFixit spent the morning tearing down RIM’s brand new tablet for an in-depth look at the inner-workings of the BlackBerry PlayBook. There aren’t too many surprises, but the firm did discuss how difficult and costly it could be to replace broken parts. If you aren’t using a case for your PlayBook just yet, here’s one reason you might want to start:

“The front camera, rear camera, and top control buttons are all attached as one assembly, making the replacement of a broken power button or volume buttons very costly.”

iFixit also said that RIM chose to build a magnesium frame around the glass LCD display, which should give it some extra durability. If you do end up shattering that 7-inch front panel, it’s not the end of the world. The LCD isn’t fused to the glass, which means a replacement should be fairly easy on you, and your wallet. Hit the jump to see iFixit’s full gallery. More →

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iPad 2 and Smart Cover guts revealed in iFixit tear-down

By on March 14, 2011 at 2:12 PM.

iPad 2 and Smart Cover guts revealed in iFixit tear-down

iFixit got down and dirty opening up the iPad 2 Wi-Fi and its Smart Cover accessory over the weekend and has published specs and pictures of the inner workings of both. There aren’t a ton of surprises hiding in the iPad 2, which sports a 1GHz A5 dual-core processor manufactured by Samsung, 512MB of LPDDR2 RAM, a 9.7-inch LED-backlit multitouch display, and 16GB, 32GB, or 64GB of internal storage. Its Wi-Fi board is powered by a Broadcom BCM43291HKUBC chip that was used in the first iPad and in the iPhone 4.

Also listed on the battery is a capacity of 6930 mAh. Since mAh = Watt-hours / volts * 1000, converting using the above numbers yields 25 / 3.8 * 1000 = 6,579. It looks like there might be some rounding going on here, or the battery voltage might actually be more like 3.6 volts.

The iPad 2 Smart Cover tear-down revealed 21 magnets (in addition to the 10 magnets in the iPad 2 itself), a large metal plate encased in plastic, and two structural plates. Hit the jump for images of a heaping serving of hardware porn.

More →

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Nexus S gets tear-down treatment from iFixit

By on December 17, 2010 at 2:12 AM.

Nexus S gets tear-down treatment from iFixit

You know what is sitting inside the Nexus S, but have you seen it? If you’re one of those people who prefer to go eyes-on (pics or it didn’t happen) then listen up. The gang over at iFixit have given the newly released Samsung Nexus S a proper tear down. While no real surprises were found under the hood, the brood does offer this warning about the 1500mAh pack found in the device:

Don’t feed this battery to a baby.

Oh, humor. Hit the read link to check out the Nexus S… inside and out. More →

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