HTC shares tumble after company infringes on Apple’s patents

By on July 18, 2011 at 8:50 AM.

HTC shares tumble after company infringes on Apple’s patents

Shares of HTC’s stock closed down 3.9% at T$871 on Monday, just three days after the the U.S. International Trade Commission announced that the Taiwanese company was guilty of infringing on two of Apple’s patents. The patents were related to a “system and method for performing an action on a structure in computer-generated data,” and a “real-time signal processing system for serially transmitted data,” but the judge’s ruling is still awaiting the review of a 6-member Commission. “We are highly confident we have a strong case for the ITC appeals process and are fully prepared to defend ourselves using all means possible,” HTC’s general council Grace Lei said on Friday “We strongly believe we have alternate solutions in place for the issues raised by Apple. We look forward to resolving this case, so we can continue creating the most innovative mobile experiences for consumers.” HTC also has an ongoing patent lawsuit against Apple. The Financial Times attributed the sell-off to “investor fears that the legal battle could have wider implications for the competitive balance between Apple and Google Android-based phonemakers like HTC, Samsung, and Motorola.” More →

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Apple initiates seven day app return policy in Taiwan

By on July 15, 2011 at 9:50 PM.

Apple initiates seven day app return policy in Taiwan

Apple has initiated a new seven day return policy in Taiwan in accordance with the country’s consumer protection laws, MacRumors reported on Friday. Taiwanese iTunes App Store customers can now receive a full refund on purchased applications within a seven day window after the purchase date. Specifically, Apple’s iTunes App Store, iBookstore, and Mac App Store terms now state:

You may cancel your purchase within seven (7) days from the date of delivery and iTunes will reimburse you for the amount paid, provided you inform iTunes that you have deleted all copies of the product. Upon cancellation you will no longer be licensed to use the product. This right cannot be waived.

Apple doesn’t currently offer that option to customers in the United States. Instead, consumers must approach Apple and request a refund on a specific app. That request will then be reviewed and Apple grants refunds as it sees fit. Google’s competing Android Market allows users to receive a full refund within a 15-minute window after downloading a new application. We’d certainly love to see Apple provide this sort of refund process in the United States, but we’re not holding our breath. More →

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