HP swaps Pre3 1.4GHz processor for dual-core 1.2GHz chip

By on July 15, 2011 at 4:01 PM.

HP swaps Pre3 1.4GHz processor for dual-core 1.2GHz chip

HP updated its Pre3 website with changes that suggest the company has swapped out the phone’s single-core processor for a dual-core chip. The site now includes a 1.2GHz dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon chip in the phone’s spec sheet, as opposed to the original 1.4GHz Scorpion CPU that was originally listed. In June the Pre3 began popping up on U.K. retail websites with a July 8th launch date, but that day has come and gone and the Pre3 has yet to make an appearance. Perhaps the processor tweak has been responsible for the delay, but that’s not yet clear. Additionally, it doesn’t appear that the company has tweaked any of the phone’s other specifications. The Pre3 passed through the FCC in May and it is expected to launch on Verizon Wireless in the U.S. Unfortunately, we’re still not sure when the device will actually hit store shelves. More →

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Verizon says its 4G phones won’t be compatible with AT&T’s LTE network

By on July 15, 2011 at 12:20 PM.

Verizon says its 4G phones won’t be compatible with AT&T’s LTE network

If you’re looking forward to the possibility of flip-flopping your smartphone’s SIM card between a Verizon Wireless 4G phone and an AT&T 4G phone, we have some bad news for you. Verizon Wireless spokeswoman Brenda Raney confirmed to PCMag on Friday that the carrier’s 4G LTE phones will not be compatible with AT&T’s 4G LTE network because the phones “run on different frequencies.” PCMag explained that while the two carriers operate within the 700MHz frequency band, AT&T will operate mostly within the 704-746MHz bands while Verizon’s 4G LTE will utilize the 746-787MHz frequencies. Additionally, Verizon still routes its voice calls over its 2G/3G CDMA network while AT&T uses GSM/HSPA. That means, until both networks are fully utilizing voice-over-LTE, it just won’t work. Sascha Segan, the article’s author, notes that it is possible for phone vendors to create devices that operate with the frequencies used by both AT&T and Verizon Wireless, but it would likely require the carriers to ink out some sort of agreement first.  More →

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AT&T and Sprint petition FCC for spectrum exchange

By on November 23, 2010 at 7:39 PM.

AT&T and Sprint petition FCC for spectrum exchange

Today, U.S. wireless providers AT&T and Sprint filed a formal letter with the FCC requesting permission to exchange several blocks of wireless spectrum. The two companies claim that the move would be mutually beneficial as it would “enhance” their ability to provide and expand services. The letter reads:

The Applicants state that the additional spectrum (including the spectrum encompassed by the de facto transfer spectrum leasing arrangement) will enable AT&T to increase its system capacity to enhance existing services, better accommodate its overall growth, and facilitate the provision of additional products and services to the public in the Dallas-Ft. Worth, Denver, New Orleans-Baton Rouge, Des Moines-Quad Cities, Honolulu, San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, Omaha, Louisville-Lexington-Evansville, Salt Lake City, and Spokane-Billings MTAs.  The Applicants also state that the transaction will enhance Sprint Nextel’s ability to expand its array of commercial mobile wireless services in the Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, New Orleans, South Bend-Mishawaka, Charlotte-Greensboro-Greenville, and Cleveland MTAs.

The release did not specify what specific bits of spectrum were to be swapped, but did note that oppositions to the deal had to be filed by December 17th of this year; a final decision should be rendered before January 1. Hit the read link to have a look at the legalese.

[Via PhoneScoop] More →

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Apple amends internal iPod water damage policy

By on November 9, 2010 at 10:10 AM.

Apple amends internal iPod water damage policy

Apple has made changes to its internal screening process pertaining to iPod liquid damage, a source told BGR. Apple builds a series of Liquid Contact Indicators (LCI) into its iPod line of devices. When these LCIs come in contact with moisture, they become activated. In the event of a warranty claim or other repair, the LCIs indicate to Apple that the device in question may have been affected by a liquid. Employees of Apple Stores and AppleCare Repair Centers then have specific guidelines used in the event liquid damage is suspected. Previously, the presence of an activated LCI within the headphone jack was cause enough for employees to state that an iPod may have been damaged by water or another liquid. Now, employees must first inspect the iPod for other signs of liquid damage before reaching that conclusion. It is currently not known if the new policy applies to iPhone models as well.

Whether or not Apple has concerns internally regarding the reliability of its LCI devices is unclear at this time. Apple may have also discovered LCIs located within the headphone jack are overly sensitive and activate even when they come in contact with permissible amounts of moisture.

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