Sounds of Street View

Now you have an awesome way to make Google Street View come to life with location-specific sounds

By on August 14, 2014 at 5:17 PM.

Now you have an awesome way to make Google Street View come to life with location-specific sounds

Google Street View is one of the best ways to take a virtual tour of a potential vacation destination, a place you want to know more about or even your own hometown, but it’s only part of the experience. With Sounds of Street View, the hearing solution professionals at Amplifon are bringing ambient noise to Google Maps. More →

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Google Street View $1.4 Million Fine

Google slapped with yet another fine over Street View

By on April 4, 2014 at 8:00 PM.

Google slapped with yet another fine over Street View

Google was handed a 1 million euro ($1.4 million) fine yesterday by Italy and has already paid it, according to Reuters. This time, Google received a fine for complaints related to its Street View program— in 2010, people complained that the cars were not easily recognizable as Google Street View cars. More →

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Google Street View Privacy Case

Google’s appeal rejected in Street View privacy case

By on September 11, 2013 at 2:40 PM.

Google’s appeal rejected in Street View privacy case

Google has been struggling with private data collection allegations ever since the Street View technology launched in 2007. Earlier this year Google agreed to pay $7 million in a settlement case to 38 states in which Google collected unsecured data. Although the case was settled, a lawsuit that claims Google violated the Wiretap Act still stands, and Google’s recent attempt to appeal the case was rejected by the federal court, according to Reuters. Google has attempted to argue that its methods of data collection, which were inadvertent, should be exempt from liability. More →

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Google Street View

Google to pay $7 million to settle Street View data collection privacy case

By on March 12, 2013 at 2:14 PM.

Google to pay $7 million to settle Street View data collection privacy case

Google’s (GOOG) Street View data collection practices have gotten it into legal hot water throughout the world and on Tuesday the company agreed to pay $7 million to settle charges leveled  by 38 state attorneys general that it improperly collected personal data from unsecured wireless networks from around the United States. Google maintains that it was unaware that some of its Street View employees were collecting the data, which it admits included “URLs of requested Web pages, partial or complete email communications, and any confidential or private information being transmitted to or from the network user while the Street View cars were driving down streets.” As part of the settlement, Google will also have to run a training program for at least the next decade instructing employees on how to respect users’ privacy while collecting data from Street View and other services. A press release on the settlement issued by the Massachusetts State Attorney General’s office is posted below. More →

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Google now lets you explore its data centers with Street View [video]

By on October 17, 2012 at 4:56 PM.

Google now lets you explore its data centers with Street View [video]

Google Data Center Street View

Have you ever wondered what Google’s (GOOG) data centers look like? Short answer: incredibly clean and organized. Google announced on its official blog that users can now take a virtual tour of its Lenoir, North Carolina data center using its Street View technology. Geeky readers can explore the center’s interior and exterior by visiting this link. Google’s official blog post says users can, “Walk in the front door, head up the stairs, turn right at the ping-pong table and head down the hall to the data center floor. Or take a stroll around the exterior of the facility to see our energy-efficient cooling infrastructure.” A video introducing Street View for Google’s Lenoir data center follows below.

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Google works to improve Web-based rival to iOS 6 Maps

By on September 27, 2012 at 12:15 PM.

Google works to improve Web-based rival to iOS 6 Maps

Google Street View Mobile Release Date

If the New York Times’ report from  Tuesday is accurate, a native Google (GOOG) Maps app for iOS might not be released until the end of the year. For the time being, it would appear iOS 6 users can either switch to Android, deal with the issues until Apple fixes them or visit Google’s mobile Maps website for their mapping needs. The Web-based solution is not ideal and it’s much slower than a dedicated app, but using Google’s Maps website in Safari or any Web browser is still more accurate than Apple’s hot new mess. It just doesn’t have Street View, Google’s huge database of stitched panoramas taken from camera-outfitted cars. According to a New York Times published on Thursday, however, Google will update its mobile Maps website with Street View within two weeks, bringing iOS users an even more robust alternative to the widely criticized Apple Maps app. More →

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French regulators tell Google to hand over undeleted Street View data

By on August 1, 2012 at 5:00 PM.

French regulators tell Google to hand over undeleted Street View data

Google Street View Scandal

The French sound just as unhappy about Google’s (GOOG) dodgy Street View data collection practices as everyone else, as Bloomberg reports that France’s data-protection authority is asking Google to fork over all the data it had scooped up from random Wi-Fi users that it hasn’t yet deleted. The current kerfuffle over data collection started last week when Google admitted to British officials that it had neglected to delete thousands of emails and passwords that its employees had collected from Wi-Fi hotspots while driving through various neighborhoods in Google Street View cars, despite being ordered to do so back in 2010. Google has apologized for its error and says that it “would now like to delete the remaining data,” Bloomberg reports. More →

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Street View lands Google in hot water… again

By on July 27, 2012 at 2:50 PM.

Street View lands Google in hot water… again

Google Street View Privacy Scandal

The controversy surrounding Google’s (GOOG) data collection practices took an unexpected turn Friday when the company admitted to British officials that it had neglected to delete thousands of emails and passwords that employees had collected from Wi-Fi hotspots while driving through various neighborhoods in Google Street View cars. As the Guardian notes, Google was ordered to delete all collected personal data back in December 2010 and failing to comply could allow the British Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) to fine the company as much as £500,000 (approximately $786,000). Google is claiming that “human error” was responsible for its failed compliance and said that it was working to correct the situation. More →

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Google Street View can keep up its Swiss watch, court rules

By on June 8, 2012 at 6:35 PM.

Google Street View can keep up its Swiss watch, court rules

Google Street View Legal Switzerland Court Rules

Anyone familiar with the Swiss knows that they’re a private sort of folk who don’t care much for the meddling of outsiders. This is a country, after all, that didn’t join the United Nations until 2002 for fear of losing its traditionally neutral stance in foreign entanglements. So you can imagine that Switzerland, which the New York Times says has “some of the strictest privacy safeguards in the world,” didn’t care much for Google snooping around its streets with its camera trucks taking pictures of everything in sight for its Google Street View Project. But the Swiss Federal Supreme Court Friday ruled that Google does indeed have the right to film and post pictures of Switzerland’s public spaces even if it can’t guarantee with 100% certainty that all the people it records will have their faces blurred out to protect their identities. However, the court also ruled that Google would have to lower its cameras to decrease the chance of peering over peoples’ fences and into their private residences. What’s more, Google will have to make sure to blur out schools, women’s shelters, prisons and other locations that the state deems to be sensitive. More →

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FCC fines Google $25,000 for unauthorized data collection and impeding investigation

By on April 16, 2012 at 7:55 PM.

FCC fines Google $25,000 for unauthorized data collection and impeding investigation

The Federal Communications Commission has fined Google $25,000 for impeding a U.S. investigation into the data collection scandal surrounding its Street View project, in which the Internet giant allegedly accessed unsecured networks and collected personal information without users’ permission. The FCC said the Mountain View-based company did not cooperate with the investigation and refused to reveal the names of its engineers associated with the project. “Google refused to identify any employees or produce any e-mails. The company could not supply compliant declarations without identifying employees it preferred not to identify,” the FCC said. “Misconduct of this nature threatens to compromise the commission’s ability to effectively investigate possible violations of the Communications Act and the commission’s rules.” More →

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Tour an 8-bit America with Google Maps tweak

By on April 2, 2012 at 8:00 PM.

Tour an 8-bit America with Google Maps tweak

Most online April Fool’s jokes are, to put it as kindly as possible, awful. Of all the companies that try to put creative “pranks” together, however, Google is among the best at managing April Fool’s stunts that are geeky enough to be laughed at in a good way rather than an uncomfortable, “I can’t believe someone thought this would be clever” way. This year, Google cooked up a creative new feature for Google Maps that lets users tour America with 8-bit graphics that will make any NES fan shed a nostalgic tear. As an added bonus, the Zelda-like U.S. landscape in this new version of Maps transforms into an 8-bit Street View when the user zooms in all the way. A link to Google’s 8-bit America follows below along with a screenshot of Street View. More →

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Apple and Google sued over ‘Street View’ on the iPad

By on February 28, 2012 at 8:40 AM.

Apple and Google sued over ‘Street View’ on the iPad

A Florida firm has filed a claim alleging that Google and Apple are both infringing on its mapping technology, PaidContent reported on Monday. PanoMap Technologies filed the complaint in an Orlando federal court, stating the use of Google Maps “Street View” feature in the iPad and iPhone violates U.S. Patent No. 6,563,529. The patent covers an “interactive system for displaying detailed view and direction in panoramic images.” The company wants Apple and Google to pay triple damages, asserting that the two tech giants knew about the patent but had ignored it. To support its allegations, PanoMap claims that Apple visited a website that showcased the patent in 2007 and Google cited the patent in its own recent patent application. The Google Maps Street View function allows users to zoom in and see an interactive photograph of houses, street corners and more. The patent was issued in 2003 and transferred to a shell company called Empire IP last year. In early February it was again transferred to PanoMap Technologies. The patent describes a technique to adjust a camera position from place to place and include it in a map image. More →

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FTC will not fine Google for stealing passwords with Street View cars

By on October 27, 2010 at 5:45 PM.

FTC will not fine Google for stealing passwords with Street View cars

Following Google’s recent admission that it accidentally stole passwords, emails and other personal information with its Street View cars, the Federal Trade Commission has decided not to issue any fines. Earlier this week, Google confirmed accusations that its Street View cars — the vehicles Google uses to take Street View images for its popular Google Maps service — inadvertently stole sensitive personal data from various homes with open Wi-Fi networks. Wednesday, the FTC confirmed that a resulting investigation did not find cause to fine Google for its unlawful actions. FTC director for consumer protection David C. Vladeck said the following in a letter to Google:

Google has made assurances to the FTC that the company has not used and will not use any of the payload data collected in any Google product or service, now or in the future. This assurance is critical to mitigate the potential harm to consumers from the collection of payload data. Because of these commitments, we are ending our inquiry into this matter at this time.

[Via CNN] More →

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