Feds launch Carrier IQ investigation

By on December 14, 2011 at 2:10 PM.

Feds launch Carrier IQ investigation

Federal investigators have launched a probe in order to examine Carrier IQ’s smartphone software, which tracks a range of activity and sends certain data to wireless carriers without users’ knowledge. Carrier IQ executives met with officials from both the Federal Trade Commission and the Federal Communications Commuission on Tuesday, The Washington Post reports. “We are complying with all investigations at this time as we have nothing to hide,” said Carrier IQ representative Mira Woods. “We have been completely transparent through this process.” Read on for more. More →

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How to find out if Carrier IQ is installed on your phone in one tap

By on December 6, 2011 at 10:00 AM.

How to find out if Carrier IQ is installed on your phone in one tap

Carrier IQ, the vendor and carrier-installed rootkit software pulled into the spotlight last month by security researcher Trevor Eckhart, has caused quite a stir. Carriers including AT&T and Sprint use the software as a means of collecting data logs that might help them identify and address connectivity problems and other issues, but the software’s covert nature and wide range of snooping capabilities make it a concern. The good news is that detecting the software on your Android phone couldn’t be easier thanks to a new app from Bitdefender called Carrier IQ Finder. Read on for more. More →

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Apple, Samsung and six more companies sued over Carrier IQ scandal

By on December 5, 2011 at 11:30 AM.

Apple, Samsung and six more companies sued over Carrier IQ scandal

Apple, HTC, Samsung, Motorola, AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Carrier IQ have been sued in a federal court by what the lawyers involved have deemed a “cell phone tracking software scandal.” Law firms Sianni & Straite LLP, Eichen Crutchlow Zaslow & McElroy LLP, and Keefe Bartels L.L.C. have jointly filed a class action complaint in a Delaware Federal Court related to the “unprecedented breach of the digital privacy rights of 150 million cell phone users.” The complaint suggests that the aforementioned carriers and vendors violated the Federal Wiretap Act, the Stored Electronic Communications Act, and the Federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. The suit of course refers to the companies’ use of Carrier IQ, the carrier and vendor-implemented cell phone spyware discovered recently on a number of handsets from multiple manufacturers. Read on for more. More →

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Carrier-installed ‘Carrier IQ’ spyware found in Android, iOS; should we panic? [video]

By on December 1, 2011 at 9:05 AM.

Carrier-installed ‘Carrier IQ’ spyware found in Android, iOS; should we panic? [video]

Last week, research published by security expert Trevor Eckhart pulled back the veil on Carrier IQ, a suite of what can seemingly be described as spyware pre-installed on a wide range of devices by both carriers and vendors. Eckhart cited a BGR story from September as an early reference to the software, which at that time was thought to be a somewhat benign set of quality-control measures. “Carrier IQ is used to understand what problems customers are having with our network or devices so we can take action to improve service quality,” a Sprint spokesperson told BGR in September. “It collects enough information to understand the customer experience with devices on our network and how to devise solutions to use and connection problems. We do not and cannot look at the contents of messages, photos, videos, etc., using this tool.” But Eckhart’s interest was piqued. Read on for more.

UPDATE: Sprint and several vendors have issued statements regarding Carrier IQ, which have been added below.  More →

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Secret Service investigates Apple Store spy camera artist [video]

By on July 8, 2011 at 1:45 PM.

Secret Service investigates Apple Store spy camera artist [video]

Brooklyn-based artist Kyle McDonald finds himself in hot water after secretly photographing Apple Store customers while they shopping for computers. “I thought maybe we could see ourselves doing this we would think more about our computers and how we’re using them,” McDonald told Mashable. Without the staff’s knowledge, the 25-year-old installed software on computers at two Apple Store locations in New York that used their integrated webcams to capture photos every 60 seconds. The software then automatically sent the photos to McDonald. The electronic artist published his project on his site and a dedicated Tumblr blog, and eyebrows were raised soon after. Mashable reports that McDonald was soon approached by the U.S. Secret Service, and his personal computers have been confiscated as part of the investigation into alleged computer fraud. McDonald says he did get Apple Store security guards’ permission to take photos in the stores, and he also asked permission while photographing patrons — with his handheld camera. McDonald makes no mention of gaining Apple’s permission to install software on display computers that secretly snaps photos and sends them to McDonald behind the scenes. A video of McDonald’s project can be viewed below. More →

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Phone Creeper: Novel security suite or spyware tool for Windows Mobile

By on June 21, 2009 at 12:03 PM.

Phone Creeper: Novel security suite or spyware tool for Windows Mobile

Touted as an espionage tool but more closely resembling spyware is a new application, Phone Creeper, written by xda-developer member chetstriker. Once installed on a Windows Mobile 5, 6.1 or 6.5 handset with .NET CF 3.5, the software tool can be used to:

  • secretly and remotely read incoming / outgoing sms
  • secretly and remotely delete incoming / outgoing sms
  • secretly and remotely view call history
  • bounce sms messages off remote phone to someone else
  • create a pop-up message on phone
  • send a secret fart sound
  • secretly and remotely listen to person – (Initiates silent call back of person to your phone with their speaker phone enabled)
  • send listening in call to somebody else’s phone
  • remote wipe of installed flash card

These above remote control commands are issued via SMS messages sent from any other handset to the “infected” Windows Mobile handset. The software is currently being distributed as a cab file that one must agree to install but, in the future, a code injector could be created to insert this application silently into any cab file. Once installed, the application does not appear in the task manager, does not have a user interface and runs silently in the background. So what do you think, the ultimate spy tool for parents of teenagers, a security suite to protect your data if your phone is stolen, or the progenitor of a whole new class of mobile phone spyware?

[Via WMExperts]

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