Where's WiMAX?

By on June 4, 2009 at 5:16 PM.

Where's WiMAX?

With rumors of a Sprint-bound tri-mode CDMA/WiFi/WiMAX handset gaining traction, we thought it might be a good time to talk about what is as opposed to what could be. Sure, a tri-mode handset would be amazing but without official word from Sprint it’s still just speculation. 3G is so 2000 and late, Sprint is the only carrier with a live 4G network here in the US… So what’s up? Hit the jump for a full assessment of where Sprint 4G is at right now and where it’s confirmed to be going in the near future.

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Sprint launches Sierra Wireless AirCard 402

By on April 21, 2009 at 1:54 PM.

Sprint launches Sierra Wireless AirCard 402

As we weigh our options in seeking out an alternative to the USB modem that completely and utterly failed us in Vegas, a new option has just presented itself in the form of a nifty little hybrid broadband card from Sprint. Announced this morning, the Sierra Wireless AirCard 402 features a unique design that allows Sprint to cover users with PC Card slots and ExpressCard slots in one swing. The design places a broadband ExpressCard within a PC Card shell — as you can see in the image above, the two pieces join when a PC Card is required, but they can also be separated to support newer, smaller notebooks and netbooks requiring an ExpressCard. Very clever. The AirCard 402 supports EV-DO Rev. A of course, giving users access to “typical upload speeds of 350-500 Kbps with peak speeds of 1.8 Mbps and typical download speeds of 600 Kbps – 1.4 Mbps with peak speeds of 3.1 Mbps where EV-DO Revision A is available.”

This little guy is definitely a nice solution for users with both a notebook and a netbook where one type of card might not fit in both. It’s also great for those of you sporting an older notebook with a PC Card slot, but who will likely be upgrading to a newer laptop in the future. The Sierra Wireless AirCard 402 is available right now and will set you back a pretty reasonable $99.99 after a $50 mail-in rebate.

[Via Press Release]

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Sprint releases Q3 2008 results

By on November 7, 2008 at 3:58 PM.

Sprint releases Q3 2008 results

sprintAs has consistently been the case in recent history, Sprint’s Q3 2008 results show a decline in revenue and a loss of customers. Sprint’s overall revenue fell 12% to $8.81 billion from $10.04 billion a year ago. Sprint’s wireless service also showed a similar decline, losing 13% from last year and 3% from last quarter. The decline in revenues was due primarily to a loss of customers as Sprint’s total number of wireless customers declined by 1.3 million during this quarter alone and almost 3.5 million since Q3 2007. Post paid customers make up the bulk of this loss during the current quarter as 1.1 million post paid customers left Sprint for its rivals. Sprint did have some good news as post-paid ARPU has stayed at $56 compared to Q1 and Q2 2008, primarily due to increase in the numbers of customers using data. Prepaid ARPU also showed a $1 increase from Q2 2008 as the number of Boost Unlimited subscribers also increased. Nonetheless, the take home message is that Sprint is continuing to lose customers at a relatively fast rate. Sprint’s introduction of several customer care programs to keep customers and encourage them to sign up for data plans may help stem the tide of its decline. It also has a decent lineup of new phones but that nagging question still looms, will new phones and new services be enough to compete against the likes of Verizon and AT&T?

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U.S. Government exempt from Early Termination Fees

By on June 13, 2008 at 5:06 AM.

U.S. Government exempt from Early Termination Fees

It seems there are some benefits to working for the man. In 2004, a company then known simply as Nextel began investigating whether they could assess ETF’s to government contracts that ended before their pre-determined termination date. At the time, Nextel’s VP of marketing issued a public statement hypothesizing that “the government will never, never accept such penalty amounts”. Uh, ok. After a lengthy process, Sprint-Nextel has now, according to the Associated Press, “ultimately decided against charging the fees to the government even though it charges the same fees to consumers and businesses.” Great. No justification for the selective treatment was given, but perhaps Sprint executives now enjoy diplomatic immunity in the Baltic region. No word on whether other telecom companies harbor similarly shady policies, but we wouldn’t be surprised if this was the case across the board. 

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