AT&T to developers: third-party application sources allowed henceforth

By on May 17, 2011 at 3:33 PM.

AT&T to developers: third-party application sources allowed henceforth

One of the major benefits of owning an Android handset is the ability to install applications from non-Market sources — without the necessity of a dev-team intervention. AT&T customers have not, however, been privy to this particular feature… that is until now. In a letter to developers, the carrier has confirmed that it will, from this point forward, allow users to install Android apps from third-party sources such as the Amazon App Store. The act of installing applications through unofficial channels — oft referred to as side-loading — has been disabled by AT&T since the introduction of its first Android handset. The carrier’s newest Android offering, the Samsung Infuse 4G, was the first device to ship with the side-loading handcuffs removed and, thankfully, it looks like it won’t be the last. More →

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Microsoft extends olive branch to Windows Phone 7 unlockers

By on December 1, 2010 at 5:28 PM.

Microsoft extends olive branch to Windows Phone 7 unlockers

In an effort to thwart unauthorized efforts to unlock or jailbreak devices running Windows Phone 7, Microsoft took a rather unorthodox approach. Rather than sending idle threats or immediately entering into the endless loop of plugging security holes and watching new ones emerge, the company extended an olive branch to the developers behind ChevronWP7. Microsoft’s Brandon Watson reached out to the ChevronWP7 team, which recently released a Windows Phone 7 unlocking tool, and opened a line of discussion about homebrew app development. As a sign of good faith during the conversations, which could ultimately lead to some kind of homebrew support from Microsoft, ChevronWP7 has agreed to pull its unlocker tool. It seems odd that Microsoft would consider helping developers build apps with capabilities not allowed under Microsoft’s developer terms. Then again, the homebrew community will emerge and grow either way. By working with homebrew developers instead of against them, perhaps Microsoft can maintain some level of control. More →

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