Apple working on a touchscreen remote for upcoming Apple TV?

By on September 29, 2009 at 7:49 AM.

Apple working on a touchscreen remote for upcoming Apple TV?

AppleRemote

Our Apple tipster (who accurately predicted organizable iPhone homescreens in iTunes as well as integrated social networking components) is back at it again! This time we’ve been sent an image that we’re told is a “product mockup that may coincide with the launch of a revised Apple TV.” It seems a little far-fetched that this unit’s only purpose would be to control an Apple TV, and you can even see a Safari option on the mockup. To be honest, it looks like a touch screen iPod nano, just longer. We’re going to dig a little bit and see what we can find, but we figured we’d run this with a high dose of caution for informational purposes.

Thanks, Lindsey!

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Google Chrome finally available for Mac, but not recommended for download

By on June 6, 2009 at 7:40 AM.

Google Chrome finally available for Mac, but not recommended for download

Lots of Google fans who are using Mac computers have been waiting for what feels like ages for Chrome. Well, it’s finally here. The only catch is that Google doesn’t recommend downloading it right now. Say what? That’s right, it’s still in very early stages and it’s actually not for general consumption just yet. So far, getting it installed is as simple as most Mac app installations are. The look mimics that of Safari 4 to keep the Apple feel, but reports are saying that some aspects of Chrome seem faster than Safari or Firefox 3. It’s available for download if you want to try it out, but pages like YouTube don’t work and editing settings is not entirely available, either. Just remember before you go crazy that it’s still in a pre-release stage and recommended for devs only.

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Omni Group sees the light, frees up four OS X apps

By on February 25, 2009 at 3:47 PM.

Omni Group sees the light, frees up four OS X apps

In the age of the internet, it seems like the surest way to prevent people from trying out your browser would be to charge for it. Charge for a web browser? Why would anyone pay for a browser when the big boys such as Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari, Opera and Chrome — and even the little guys like Flock and Camino — are free? The Omni Group however, has been charging for OmniWeb since the dawn of time (ok, since 1995) and its business model must have some logic behind it as its browser still has a sizable niche user base. But alas… Times they are a-changin’ and now that everything on the interwebs is free, the Omni Group’s hand was apparently forced. As of yesterday, four OmniGroup apps have moved from pay to free distribution models: OmniWeb, a Mac-only web browser – the company’s most notable offering perhaps; OmniDazzle, a collection of visual effects; OmniDiskSweeper, a disk cleanup utility; and OmniObjectMeter, a memory management and repair utility for developers. With this move the Omni Group hopes to gain a slightly wider audience and as heralded as its software is by many current users, we don’t doubt that the unshackling of these apps will pay off in the long run.

[Via Cult of Mac]

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Apple releases Safari 4 beta

By on February 24, 2009 at 9:40 AM.

Apple releases Safari 4 beta

Apple has finally released its much anticipated Safari update this morning along with a host of performance upgrades and feature additions. Tagged Safari 4 beta, the new version is available as a download from the Apple site only for the time being and will not update automatically via the Apple Software Update system. In terms of notable enhancements, here are some highlights:

  • Top Sites (pictured above) – A graphical representation of your most frequently-visited websites with one-click launching
  • Cover Flow – Browse bookmarks and history with Apple’s Cover Flow UI
  • Full History Search – Keyword history search with Cover Flow UI
  • Tabs – Tabs now appear above the address bar
  • “Nitro Engine” – Lame name, solid performance — Safari now executes JavaScript 4.2 times faster
  • Windows Native Look – Safari 4 beta for Windows now adopts the look and feel of a standard Windows program

So who’s excited? Are any non-Safari users going to give it another try with this release?

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Apple iPhone; now with copy and paste, sort of

By on December 11, 2008 at 8:11 AM.

Apple iPhone; now with copy and paste, sort of

“Oh, but it doesn’t do copy and paste!” Rejoice, iPhone users, because now you can tell all your friends they’re only half wrong when they tell you your phone is inadequate because of the missing copy/paste feature. Now, thanks to a company called Pastebud, without jailbreaking or downloading any apps from the App Store, you can have copy and paste on your iPhone. But with a catch – or two. First, it only works between Safari and Mail. The other issue is you have to use two bookmarks in Safari to prep the process. Though it is still very limited in copy and paste capabilities, this is definitely a welcome start and bonus. So the next time you hear someone say, “Hey you with the iPhone! Does that thing do copy and paste?”, you say, “Hell yeah it does! Well, kinda…” Hit the read link for a video demonstration.

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The future of Fennec may make it a serious mobile browser contender

By on November 10, 2008 at 6:32 AM.

The future of Fennec may make it a serious mobile browser contender

The mobile browser wars are on. The competition is between Opera, Mobile IE, Safari, Chrome, and the Blackberry Browser. So far, even iPhone haters would agree, Safari has yet to be touched. It only makes sense that one of the most popular browsers out there, Firefox, and their creator, Mozilla, would want to jump in on the mobile browser battle. A few weeks ago, Fennec, Mozilla’s upcoming mobile browser, was released to some beta testers but was only available for the Nokia N810 Internet tablet. While the programmers testing it out found a lot of bugs, they also felt there is a lot of promise for Mozilla’s latest browser offering. Jay Sullivan, vice president of the mobile division at Mozilla, says the reports from testers were positive and that JavaScript performance was on par with the browsers on Android and the iPhone’s Safari.

If anyone knows how to make a browser powerful, but user-friendly, it’s Mozilla. Fennec is going to be no different in terms of their end goal for the mobile browser. First, they intend to use every last bit of screen real-estate to the browser, removing all controls, tabs, and buttons that would take away from the body of the page. Sullivan says they want to “give over the entire screen of the device to the Web content, removing all user-interface controls entirely.” How will a user navigate, you ask? Certain screen controls and finger swipes (for touchscreens) will activate the UI controls in a snap. If that isn’t cool enough for you, future versions may also include support for haptic feedback. While this is all cool and snazzy, Fennec has its work cut out because the others (Safari, Opera, Blackberry, Symbian) have established themselves and are still making progress. For more info on Fennec and what its future holds, hit the link!

Thanks, Chris!

[Via UnwiredView]

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SquirrelFish is To WebKit as Steroids are to Baseball

By on June 3, 2008 at 12:48 PM.

SquirrelFish is To WebKit as Steroids are to Baseball

Ok, maybe that’s not the best analogy since SquirrelFish isn’t illegal. With performance figures like this however, competing mobile browsers may wish it was. WebKit, the driving force behind “real web in your pocket” browsers such as the S60 Browser and Apple’s mobile Safari, has just received a new juiced-up JavaScript interpreter that bumps efficiency up considerably. Codenamed SquirrelFish, WebKit’s new interpreter is a whopping 60% faster than its predecessor as displayed by the graph above showing the results of SunSpider JavaScript benchmark tests. From the announcement:

SquirrelFish is a register-based, direct-threaded, high-level bytecode engine, with a sliding register window calling convention. It lazily generates bytecodes from a syntax tree, using a simple one-pass compiler with built-in copy propagation.

Right then. All you really need to know is that once future builds of WebKit are incorporated into your mobile browser of choice, JavaScript performance is going to be a heck of a lot faster. SquirrelFish is also just the first step in a series of enhancements. Juice it up fellas!

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