Microsoft's Q2 revenue from Android estimated at three times its Windows Phone revenue

By on August 4, 2011 at 12:45 PM.

Microsoft's Q2 revenue from Android estimated at three times its Windows Phone revenue

Thanks to royalty payments from awards related to patent complaints against HTC, Microsoft is estimated to have made three times more revenue from sales of HTC’s Android phones than it did from sales of Windows Phone licenses last quarter. Asymco analyst Horace Dediu estimated this past May that Microsoft had made five times more money from HTC’s Android phones than its own Windows Phone platform through the first quarter of this year. In the second quarter, Dediu says Microsoft made approximately $21 million from 1.4 million Windows Phone licenses at $15 a piece, while the company’s $5-per-device royalty from sales of 12 million HTC Android phones brought in $60 million in the quarter. Dediu’s numbers are based on Canalys’ Windows Phone shipment estimates and the 12.1 million handsets HTC says it shipped in the second quarter, though we’re not sure how the analyst determined that 12 million of those devices were Android phones. HTC also sells phones that run Microsoft’s Windows Phone operating system and phones based on Qualcomm’s Brew MP platform. More →

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Pandora resolves royalty dispute; policy changes coming

By on July 8, 2009 at 2:53 PM.

Pandora resolves royalty dispute; policy changes coming

First and foremost, Internet radio lovers have some serious cause for celebration as Pandora announces a somewhat workable resolution to the ongoing royalty dispute that nearly drove the company into the ground. By somewhat workable, we mean it’ll keep them in business but it’s still paying the highest royalty rate in radio. What does this mean for Pandora users? Well it means they can keep using Pandora of course, and 90 percent of users will experience no changes whatsoever. For the other 10 percent though — users who don’t pay for Pandora One but stream more than 40 hours of music per month — the free ride is over to an extent. Any non-subscriber who goes over 40 hours in a month will have to cough up $0.99 in order to continue streaming during that month. $0.99, as in less than a dollar… We’d say that’s pretty fair. In all seriousness though, if you’re listening to 480+ hours of Pandora per year and not supporting the company by forking over $36 for a year of Pandora One, well, you should definitely consider it. So congratulations to Pandora on ending a 2-year fiasco. It might not have been the best possible outcome but hey, if it keeps the company afloat it’s not all bad.

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