AT&T: Our 4G LTE phones are better than your 4G LTE phones

By on October 12, 2011 at 10:50 AM.

AT&T: Our 4G LTE phones are better than your 4G LTE phones

We’re seeing a trend here. AT&T CEO Ralph de la Vega on Tuesday stated that the carrier’s upcoming 4G LTE smartphones will be thinner and more power-efficient than comparable devices currently on the market. Speaking with CNET’s Roger Cheng during the CTIA Enterprise & Applications conference in San Diego on Tuesday, the AT&T chief said the company will begin launching LTE phones in the fourth quarter that utilize a new technology allowing for slimmer profiles and longer battery life. The availability of this technology, the report states, dictated the carrier’s launch schedule for the phones. Read on for more. More →

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AT&T teams with Amazon to offer $139 Kindle 3G with Special Offers

By on July 14, 2011 at 12:31 AM.

AT&T teams with Amazon to offer $139 Kindle 3G with Special Offers

Amazon announced on Wednesday that AT&T will sponsor a new Kindle 3G with Special Offers, a deal that has lowered the price of the device $50 to $139.99. In a statement, AT&T’s CEO Ralph de la Vega said that the Kindle 3G is “by far the fastest growing connected device” on AT&T’s network. Amazon’s “Special Offers” devices come at the cost of ad-sponsored content. Users will see advertisements at the bottom of the screen and can launch the “AdMash” Kindle application to choose which advertisements are displayed. The $114 Kindle Wi-Fi with Special Offers device, which launched in April, is currently the best selling version of the popular eReader. Read on for the full press release. More →

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AT&T CEO: Our 4G LTE network is 2-3 years behind Verizon’s [updated]

By on June 3, 2011 at 1:00 PM.

AT&T CEO: Our 4G LTE network is 2-3 years behind Verizon’s [updated]

Speaking during a D9 press event in California on Thursday, AT&T Mobility’s CEO Ralph de la Vega said it will take AT&T between 2 and 3 years to bring its LTE network coverage up to a par with Verizon Wireless’ 4G offering. AT&T has already announced that it plans to deploy its 4G LTE network to five cities this summer, including Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio. However, Verizon’s network is already available in 55 markets, it plans to deploy in 23 more this month, and the carrier has promised full 4G LTE coverage across its current 3G network by the end of 2013. According to CNN, Ralph de la Vega said AT&T “can’t say when” its 4G network will match Verizon’s but said “in the next two to three years they will probably be indistinguishable.” The carrier also reaffirmed that if its proposed acquisition of T-Mobile is approved, customers should see a large improvement the in overall quality and reliability of AT&T’s service.

UPDATE: AT&T spokesperson Seth Bloom provided BGR with the following comments via email: More →

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Live from CTIA Wireless’ day 1 keynote!

By on March 22, 2011 at 8:45 AM.

Live from CTIA Wireless’ day 1 keynote!

Greetings from CTIA Wireless 2011! The conference is about to officially kickoff, and what better way to start an event than with a keynote. While we’re not expecting to hear any product announcements at this particular keynote, the group on stage will definitely have plenty to talk about. Verizon Wireless CEO, Dan Meade; Sprint CEO, Dan Hesse; AT&T CEO, Ralph de la Vega; and T-Mobile USA CEO, Philipp Humm will be sitting down for a “carrier roundtable” hosted by CNBC’s Jim Cramer. We’re hoping to hear some dialogue on the proposed merger between AT&T and T-Mobile from the wireless executives. The event kicks off at 9:00 a.m. ET, hit the jump to follow along! More →

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AT&T CEO: Verizon, Google net-neutrality proposal good for the industry

By on August 12, 2010 at 12:59 AM.

AT&T CEO: Verizon, Google net-neutrality proposal good for the industry

This morning while speaking in Boston, AT&T Mobility’s CEO Ralph de la Vega quipped that the net-neutrality agreement recently published by Verizon and Google was “good for the industry.” AT&T’s chief went on to say that the pact, “indicates that two companies from different industries can come together on a difficult issue.” The Electronic Frontier Foundation analyzed the joint proposal, saying: “It carves out exemptions from neutrality requirements for so-called ‘unlawful’ content, for wireless services, and for very vaguely-defined ‘additional online services.’ The definition of ‘reasonable network management’ is also problematically vague. As many, many, many have already pointed out, these exemptions threaten to completely undermine the stated goal of neutrality.” Whether you love or hate the Google/Verizon net-neutrality proposal, it has brought attention to this hot-button issue. An issue that needs to be addressed sooner rather than later. What are your thoughts on the proposal? More →

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Live from CTIA 2010's day one keynote with AT&T's Ralph de la Vega

By on March 23, 2010 at 12:00 PM.

Live from CTIA 2010's day one keynote with AT&T's Ralph de la Vega

Keynote-1

Yes, yes y’all, we’re ready to bring the action straight from the first day of CTIA 2010. Up first is the opening keynote with AT&Ts CEO of Mobility, Ralph de la Vega. Sit back, relax, and hopefully stand up and shout when some news breaks! More →

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Sling Media: We didn't work with AT&T

By on February 5, 2010 at 3:20 PM.

Sling Media: We didn't work with AT&T

Sling Player on BlackBerry Bold

Yesterday, we told you about an official AT&T press release that boasted of a partnership between AT&T and Sling Media, maker of the popular streaming television appliance Slingbox. In the press release AT&T CEO Ralph de la Vega said, “Just as we’ve worked with Sling Media in this instance, we look forward to collaborating with other developers so that mobile customers can access a wider, more bandwidth-sensitive, and powerful range of applications in the future.” AT&T’s CEO was referring to a compromise reached over the Slingbox Mobile media player that was banned from AT&T’s network due to bandwidth concerns. In a subsequent interview de la Vega continued, “They [Sling Media] made important changes to more efficiently use 3G network bandwidth and conserve wireless spectrum so that we were able to support the app on our 3G mobile broadband network.” So, what’s the problem? When Ars Technica caught up with Sling Media’s John Santoro, he had this to say: “We didn’t change anything, AT&T never discussed any specific requirements with us.” Santoro went onto explain that the code to optimize the Slingbox Mobile’s video stream, based on connection quality and network traffic, has remained unchanged since Slingplayer Mobile was first launched. A little egg in the face for AT&T, but hey, we’re getting Slingplayer Mobile, and in the words of Sling Media, “whatever the reason, we’re just glad AT&T has approved it.”

UPDATE: It seems that SlingMedia did, in fact, work with AT&T on getting this approved after all. Apparently while no code changes to the streaming portion of the application was changed due to AT&T’s requests, Sling did update it during continued development. AT&T later approved the application on their network for usage on iPhone devices.  More →

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AT&T's plans to improve network reliability and what that means for you

By on December 10, 2009 at 3:44 PM.

AT&T's plans to improve network reliability and what that means for you

AT&T’s Ralph de la Vega announced yesterday that the carrier would start taking steps to improve its network and acknowledged that service in some areas is sub-par (most of you would agree that that’s an understatement). After launching Mark the Spot, an app for the data-hogging iPhone that allows users to report network issues, it looks like AT&T is moving forward with making its user experience smoother and more reliable. De la Vega was pretty optimistic when he said, “In both of those markets, I am very confident that you’re going to see significant progress.” Just how is AT&T going to go about doing that and how will it affect you? Hit the jump to find out. More →

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AT&T promises improved performance for SF and NYC

By on December 9, 2009 at 5:11 PM.

AT&T promises improved performance for SF and NYC

We’ve all heard the jokes about AT&T’s sub-par performance and how iPhone users are clogging up its network. Dropped calls, missed texts and delayed voicemails have become so common that AT&T even released an iPhone app that allows you to report network issues. The areas that seem to be affected most are densely populated cities — namely San Francisco and New York (in Los Angeles, AT&T service seems to be fine in our experience; it’s heavily populated but not too dense). And guess where the most vocal AT&T users are coming from?

AT&T’s very own Ralph de la Vega says that Manhattan and San Francisco’s Financial District “are performing at levels below our standards.” In our own experiences, it seems much worse than that, but we’re happy to finally hear it being acknowledged and addressed. He also says that these issues are going to get fixed. “In both of those markets, I am very confident that you’re going to see significant progress.” Thanks for finally coming out and openly saying it, AT&T, instead of hiding behind figures like “our network covers 97% of the population.” We’re looking forward to the improvements. More →

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