'Anonymous' hacker quits, calls group's members hypocrites and its efforts fruitless

By on August 19, 2011 at 4:40 PM.

'Anonymous' hacker quits, calls group's members hypocrites and its efforts fruitless

An alleged member of the notorious hacker collective “Anonymous” has apparently outed himself and quit. The UK-based hacker, who says his real name is Matthew, operated under the pseudonym “SparkyBlaze” during his time with Anonymous. As to his reasons for leaving the group, he points mainly to LulzSec, the AntiSec movement, and Anonymous’ leadership. “When I started with Anon I thought I was helping people but over the past few months things inside anon have changed,” the hacker said in a statement posted to the Web. “I am mostly talking about AntiSec and LulzSec. They both go against what I stand for (and what anonymous says they stand for). Antisec has released gig after gig of innocent peoples information. For what? What did they do? Does anon have the right to remove the anonymity of innocent people? They are always talking about peoples right to remain anonymous so why are they removing that right?” To the Anonymous members he leaves behind, SparyBlaze adds, “You are not helping anyone.” He continues, “Think about the long run. Some thinking now can save you some large legal bills later. And yes i will be there when you get out of court to say: I told you so. There are other ways to help people, just don’t go to anon you are not hurting the governments you are hurting yourselves in the long run.” The hacker’s full statement follows below. More →

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Apple's lead mobile ad exec leaves company for VC

By on August 18, 2011 at 1:10 AM.

Apple's lead mobile ad exec leaves company for VC

Apple’s vice president of mobile advertising Andy Miller has left the company to join Highland Capital Partners as a general partner, AllThingsD reported on Wednesday. Highland Capital Partners bills itself as a “venture capital firm focused on building companies in the communications, consumer, digital media, healthcare and information technology markets,” and says it has invested in over 225 seed, early and growth stage companies since 1988. 100 of those companies have gone public or were acquired by other firms. Miller sold his own mobile advertising firm, Quattro Wireless, to Apple for $275 million in 2010. Apple eventually stopped using Quattro’s technology and instead deployed its own iAd mobile advertising platform across its mobile devices including the iPad, iPhone and iPod touch. AllThingsD said Apple told its staff of Miller’s departure on Wednesday and that the firm will now begin to look for a replacement. More →

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Microsoft's Windows Phone GM quits to launch own company

By on August 8, 2011 at 1:30 PM.

Microsoft's Windows Phone GM quits to launch own company

Microsoft’s General Manager of the Windows Phone Developer Experience on Monday announced that he is leaving Microsoft to launch a start up. Kindel did not share the details of his new endeavor, and his public profile on networking site LinkedIn lists him as Founder and CTO of <redacted> at A super secret stealth startup. “[The start up] has to do with sports, advertising, mobile, social-networking, and, of course, the cloud,” Kindel wrote in a post on his personal blog. “I’m insanely excited to get started.” The soon-to-be former executive was with Microsoft for 21 years, having joined the Redmond-based company’s developer support group in 1990. Kindel’s full email to his team regarding the decision follows below. More →

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HTC’s Chief Innovation Officer, Horace Luke, resigns for personal reasons

By on July 25, 2011 at 1:44 PM.

HTC’s Chief Innovation Officer, Horace Luke, resigns for personal reasons

BGR has exclusively learned that Horace Luke, former Chief Innovation Officer at HTC, has left the company as of April 30th 2011. “Horace Luke, HTC’s chief innovation officer, has left HTC for personal reasons. Horace nurtured a culture of innovation at HTC and instilled a strong consumer design-focus among our employees who continue to raise the bar in designing products that capture our customers’ imagination,” HTC told BGR in a statement. “We are grateful for Horace’s many contributions to HTC and wish him well in his future endeavors. Scott Croyle, HTC’s vice president of design, has taken over Horace’s responsibilities and will continue a tradition of design innovation at HTC.” Luke had been at HTC since November 2006 when he left his role as Creative Director at Microsoft to join the emerging Taiwan-based smartphone vendor. He was with Microsoft for a total of nine years, where he headed up the Creative departments for products including Xbox, Windows XP, Microsoft research and Windows Mobile.

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