Facial Recognition Tech

Facial recognition tech: Privacy, best practices on Obama’s agenda

By on December 4, 2013 at 10:00 PM.

Facial recognition tech: Privacy, best practices on Obama’s agenda

The National Telecommunication & Information Administration (NTIA) on Tuesday announced that it plans to hold a variety of meetings next year, starting in early February, to discuss the use of facial recognition technology in modern devices. The NTIA will also look to develop a “voluntary, enforceable code of conduct that specifies how the Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights applies” for the technology. More →

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Google Privacy Policy

Dutch regulator: ‘Google spins an invisible web of our personal data’

By on November 29, 2013 at 9:30 AM.

Dutch regulator: ‘Google spins an invisible web of our personal data’

A Dutch regulator on Thursday said that Google’s privacy policy update in March 2012 that covers all the online services offered by the search giant is in breach of local laws. “Google spins an invisible web of our personal data, without our consent,” Jacob Kohnstamm, chairman of the College for the Protection of Personal Data said. “And that is forbidden by law.” In a press release, the regulator said that Google is collecting information about its users through various services and combines the obtained data in order to deliver tailored ads and content to users. More →

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LG Smart TV Spying Fix

LG vows to fix Smart TVs that spy on users

By on November 21, 2013 at 2:55 PM.

LG vows to fix Smart TVs that spy on users

After an LG Smart TV owner discovered that his unit was sending personal data including channel history and even name files from external storage devices to an LG web address while ignoring privacy settings, the South Korean TV maker admitted the problem exists and promised to issue a firmware update to fix it. The company said that it has been collecting private data on some Smart TV models even when the feature was turned off, Engadget reports. More →

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LG Smart TV Spying

Privacy settings not enough to stop LG Smart TV from spying on users

By on November 20, 2013 at 11:45 PM.

Privacy settings not enough to stop LG Smart TV from spying on users

An LG Smart TV owner in the United Kingdom has shockingly discovered that his device is sending unencrypted data over Wi-Fi containing TV watching habits, as well as file names from external storage units hooked up to the TV to an LG website, even though the TV’s privacy settings should have prevented such behavior. The Smart TV model in question is the LG 42LN572V that was manufactured in May 2013. More →

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Microsoft Privacy Policy Criticism NSA

Former Microsoft privacy advisor: ‘I don’t trust Microsoft now’

By on October 1, 2013 at 10:34 AM.

Former Microsoft privacy advisor: ‘I don’t trust Microsoft now’

It’s doubtful that Microsoft will recruit its former privacy advisor Caspar Bowden to help it come up with witty one-liners for its next round of “Scroogled” ads. The Guardian reports that Bowden this week claimed he had no knowledge of Microsoft’s involvement with the National Security Agency’s PRISM data collection program while he worked as the company’s top privacy advisor from 2002 through 2011. What’s more, he said that major tech companies’ cooperation with the NSA should lead their customers to seriously rethink how much information they’re willing to share on the web. More →

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McAfee NSA Privacy Device

John McAfee transitions from blocking viruses to blocking the NSA

By on September 30, 2013 at 6:15 PM.

John McAfee transitions from blocking viruses to blocking the NSA

John McAfee is one of the strangest characters in the tech world, and for a while everyone thought he might be a murderer, so it only comes as a moderate shock that his most recent plans involve thwarting the NSA. Future Tense Central is the homepage for the D-Central device, which McAfee claims will create a private network for a small group of users that cannot be traced by any outside sources. D-Central has supposedly been in the planning phases for several years, but a countdown on Future Tense Central is currently leading up to next March, when a prototype of the device might see the light of day. If McAfee’s plans do come to fruition, D-Central will sell for less than $100 and NSA analysts will no longer be able snoop on our files or, even worse, attempt to date us.

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Online Privacy Guide

How to hide your online activity

By on August 8, 2013 at 1:10 PM.

How to hide your online activity

With the NSA spying on everyone on the planet (not really), Apple tracking your every move (not really) and hackers constantly running amok (really), online privacy is one of the hottest topics around right now. Of course, some concerns might be just a tad overblown, but it’s still not a bad idea to know what your options are when it comes to hiding your online activity. As such, Co.Labs writer Abram Handler recently put together a quick little guide that will help worried Web users protect their digital communications, including instructions on how to encrypt chats and emails sent from your computer. And for those concerned about mobile spying, BGR already has you covered with our earlier piece on which mobile chat apps will best protect you from the NSA’s watchful eye.

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Texas Email Spying Law Warrant

Texas becomes first state to require warrants before cops can spy on email

By on June 18, 2013 at 3:20 PM.

Texas becomes first state to require warrants before cops can spy on email

Don’t mess with Texans’ email. Ars Technica reports that Texas has become the first state in the United States that requires law enforcement officials to get search warrants before snooping on citizens’ emails. The law only applies to state and local law enforcement officials, however, and won’t apply to federal officials who can still access emails without a warrant once they’ve been opened or if they’ve sat unopened in a user’s inbox for more than 180 days. The new Texas law comes at a time when electronic privacy has become a hot-button issue in the wake of revelations about the National Security Agency’s vast data collection program.

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Facebook Privacy Changes

Facebook to introduce better privacy controls, force everyone to be included in searches

By on December 12, 2012 at 12:55 PM.

Facebook to introduce better privacy controls, force everyone to be included in searches

Facebook (FB) is planning another round of privacy changes with a focus on making it easier to control what’s shared and what’s not, according to The New York Times. Sam Lessin, Facebook’s director of product told the publication that a new always-visible button called “Privacy Shortcuts” will be added that will let users quickly change settings for what they share. Users will also finally be able to block other users they don’t want to have any interaction with. More →

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Congressional report says drones could spell the death of privacy

By on September 13, 2012 at 10:30 PM.

Congressional report says drones could spell the death of privacy

Congressional Report Drones

It’s not just paranoid people who should be freaked out about having unmanned spy drones hovering over their neighborhoods at all times, as a new report from the Congressional Research Service says that drones could effectively end privacy in the United States. Andrew Counts of DigitalTrends does an excellent job of going through the CRS report and finds a number of details that should unnerve anyone who cares one bit about their right to privacy. More →

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FBI plugs $1 billion into facial recognition tech to turn America into its own game of ‘Where’s Waldo?’

By on September 7, 2012 at 12:10 PM.

FBI plugs $1 billion into facial recognition tech to turn America into its own game of ‘Where’s Waldo?’

FBI Facial Recognition Technology

Hiding in plain sight is about to get a whole lot harder. New Scientist reports that the FBI is spending $1 billion to add facial recognition technology to its national fingerprint database as part of a broad upgrade aimed at making it easier to identify alleged criminals. While this sounds rather scary for civil libertarians, the FBI says that the facial recognition data base will only include official mug shots of known criminals, although New Scientist writes that there’s no guarantee the FBI will stick with this limited implementation. The site also reports that the database upgrade will “add biometrics such as iris scans, DNA analysis and voice identification” into the mix along with facial recognition tech.

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Google assembling ‘red team’ to prevent future FTC fines over user privacy

By on August 25, 2012 at 5:30 PM.

Google assembling ‘red team’ to prevent future FTC fines over user privacy

Google Privacy Risks

Getting busted for allegedly violating your users’ privacy is never fun for any company, but for Google (GOOG) it recently became costly to the tune of a $22.5 million fine from the Federal Trade Commission. Never one to remain passive, Google has started scouting around for privacy experts who will comprise a new “red team” that will aggressively seek out user privacy risks within Google products.

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California cops barred from warrantless GPS, cellphone tracking

By on August 23, 2012 at 6:05 PM.

California cops barred from warrantless GPS, cellphone tracking

California Privacy Legislation

California’s state legislature has just passed a law requiring police to obtain a proper warrant before using tracking technologies such as GPS to gather information on suspects, Ars Technica reports. The legislation, which was co-sponsored by both the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation, now heads to Governor Jerry Brown’s desk for a signature, although Ars notes that Brown “vetoed California’s last attempt at enforcing stricter privacy rules in 2011, when he killed a bill that would have prevented police from searching the phones of apprehended suspects without a warrant.” More →

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