Laser vs. plasma: Warming up for the battle royale

By on November 3, 2008 at 11:03 AM.

Laser vs. plasma: Warming up for the battle royale

Ok, ok… Let’s not get too excited just yet. It still might be a bit early to reach any real conclusions about laser televisions and how desirable they will be once they hit the market en masse. How will lower-end models fare compared to higher-end models? How will size vs. cost pan out? How high will the early adopter tax be? There are plenty more questions that still need to be answered but in the meantime, above is a nice little taste of things to come. Two gadget-loving Texans have pitted the upcoming Mitsubishi LaserVue laser TV against Pioneer’s 60-inch Kuro plasma and yes, things got hot and heavy. The focus of this preliminary match up was color and the laser box had a strong showing. The second pair of images above highlights how vivid the colors are displayed on the LaserVue, particularly the red range. In certain other ranges however, the difference is negligible. The post also notes the tremendous benfits of laser in terms of power consumption, with the LaserVue sipping 135 watts compared to the Kuro’s 524 watts. It’s not all gravy however, as the post also highlights viewing angle as a big advantage of the plasma display – even going as far as to liken the LaserVue’s viewing angle to a DLP set. We can’t wait for the battle between laser and plasma to heat up even more – in the end, more competition means prices drop and consumers win.

[Via Gadget Lab]

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Tis the season for flat panel TVs

By on October 26, 2008 at 1:21 PM.

Tis the season for flat panel TVs

Call it a sign of the economic times or call it gift from Santa, but it looks like this holiday season will be the perfect time to finally pick up that LCD or plasma set you’ve had your eye on – as long as your house isn’t in foreclosure by then. According to Paul Gagnon, Director of North American TV market research at DisplaySearch, this holiday season will see some pretty attractive price cuts on flat panel TVs of all sizes. Here are his predictions:

  • 19-inch high definition LCD: $199
  • 32-inch HD LCD: $399-$499
  • 40-inch 1080p LCD: $799-$999
  • 42-inch HD plasma: $599-$699
  • 50-inch HD plasma: $899-$999

There is no question that this holiday shopping season will be among the worst in recent history for retailers nation-wide. As such, it stands to reason that we’ll be seeing discounted pricing all over the place. Even still, $200 for an LCD perfect for any kitchen? $900 for a 50-incher? Those prices will nearly put retail stores on par with current shady-shop internet prices – and they’ll even come with a warranty. Gagnon predicts that shoppers will likely seek out good picture quality in more stripped down models as opposed to high-end name brands, and is looking at discount stores such as Wal-Mart and Costco as the retailers of choice for many.

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Slow Sales Lead to Mass HDTV Price Cuts

By on July 16, 2008 at 1:01 PM.

Slow Sales Lead to Mass HDTV Price Cuts

As the economy continues to decline and unemployment rates continue to rise, now is a tough time for everyone. Particularly tough perhaps, if a big part of your business involves selling luxury items like HDTVs. In times of economic crisis people most often forgo big ticket items such as plasma and LCD TVs and opt to spend their money on, say, food and fuel. If you’re not one of the unlucky Americans hit hard by the current state of the union however, you might as well take advantage of some serious and wide-spread price dropping. The HDTV price cuts are manufacturer-instigated in most cases so the result will impact retailers across the country. While these new prices at major retailers still might not be the lowest you’ll find on the internet, it’s safe to assume eventually the price drops will be reflected in non-brick and mortar pricing as well. If things like a warranty and knowing for a fact that you won’t be screwed by some shady fly by night website, we say stick to the major shops and enjoy these cuts that bring most price points down to at least near-internet levels. Hit the read link to check out the full list of price drops, which includes 30 different HDTV models. The new pricing ranges from $100 off to $500 off; even up to $700 off taking a few new Best Buy sales into account.

[Via Unplggd]

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