ISP Six Strikes Policy

ISPs will basically break your Internet service if they catch you pirating too much content

By on November 16, 2012 at 2:55 PM.

ISPs will basically break your Internet service if they catch you pirating too much content

Internet Service Providers have long promised/threatened to implement a “six strikes” piracy policy that provides six notifications to alleged pirates before their service is degraded or temporarily revoked. And now, thanks to Ars Technica, we have some details on exactly how the oft-delayed policy will work in practice. Basically, there are three “stages” ISPs will go through before taking action: a “notice” phase that “involves letting users know they’ve been tracked on copyright-infringing sites”; an “acknowledgement” phase in which “the customer will have to actually acknowledge having received those notices”; and finally, the “mitigation” phase where “users who have traded copyrighted files are actually punished.” More →

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Porn Piracy Fine

Court hits alleged Virginia porn pirate with enormous $1.5 million fine

By on November 3, 2012 at 12:09 AM.

Court hits alleged Virginia porn pirate with enormous $1.5 million fine

Pirating massive amounts of gay porn via BitTorrent may not be as rewarding as it seems. According to BBC News, a federal court in Illinois has slapped Virginia resident Kywan Fisher with a $1.5 million fine for allegedly pirating 10 pornographic films onto a BitTorrent site and then illegally distributing them to thousands of other viewers. The court awarded Flava Works, the film company that filed suit against Fisher, an award of $150,000 per film largely because it gave evidence that allegedly “demonstrated that Mr Fisher was the person who put copies of its films on a BitTorrent site.” BBC News says that the $1.5 million award is “believed to the biggest awarded in a file-sharing case.”

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U.S. government seizes three popular Android piracy sites

By on August 22, 2012 at 7:00 PM.

U.S. government seizes three popular Android piracy sites

Android Piracy Websites U.S. Government

The Department of Justice on Wednesday announced that in connection with Dutch and French law enforcement agencies, it has seized three of the most popular sites for illegally downloading Android apps. The three domains — Appbucket, Snappzmarket and Applanet — are now in the custody of the federal government, and would-be visitors are greeted with an FBI seizure notice. “Criminal copyright laws apply to apps for cell phones and tablets, just as they do to other software, music and writings. These laws protect and encourage the hard work and ingenuity of software developers entering this growing and important part of our economy,” U.S. Attorney Sally Quillian Yates said. “We will continue to seize and shut down websites that market pirated apps, and to pursue those responsible for criminal charges if appropriate.” The DOJ’s press release follows below. More →

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Digital piracy cannot be stopped

By on August 6, 2012 at 10:30 PM.

Digital piracy cannot be stopped

Online Piracy Authorities Struggle

From the early days of IRC to the creation of The Pirate Bay, online piracy has grown from a minor annoyance perpetrated by an underground community to a mainstream issue that impacts several industries. Internet savvy users originally shared music and videos with one another through a string of underground chatrooms, however with the rise of video-sharing website YouTube, it has become increasingly easy to watch or listen to copyrighted material on the Web for free. While Google (GOOG) does its best to remove infringing content, throughout the years users have found various techniques that allow them to bypass the Internet giant’s search and destroy tools, and keep their videos online for millions to see. YouTube and similar sites are only the tip of the iceberg, however.  More →

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Music industry again hoards Pirate Bay booty, starves artists

By on July 30, 2012 at 6:25 PM.

Music industry again hoards Pirate Bay booty, starves artists

Pirate Bay Compensation

Wait, people didn’t really expect the music industry to share copyright infringement winnings with the people who actually make music, did they? TorrentFreak reported over the weekend that a leaked report from the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) stated explicitly that any compensation won by recording companies as part of the Pirate Bay verdict would go directly to anti-piracy campaigns rather than to the artists who were actually hurt by music piracy. More →

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Music industry’s anti-piracy playbook revealed: Site blocking, app removal and litigation

By on July 25, 2012 at 6:00 PM.

Music industry’s anti-piracy playbook revealed: Site blocking, app removal and litigation

Anti-Piracy Strategy Music Industry

A leaked confidential report from the archaically-named International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) has revealed a wide range of strategies being employed by the recording industry to fight piracy, including petitioning for the removal of third-party music apps from app stores and petitioning ISPs to block sites that offer pirated music. The report, obtained by TorrentFreak, shows that the IFPI is advising the music industry to attack piracy with multiple tactics that are divided into five broad categories:  Take down, Disruption, Investigation, Lobbying and Litigation. More →

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Developer slams Android app store, calls it ‘broken’ and ‘designed for piracy’

By on July 25, 2012 at 12:25 PM.

Developer slams Android app store, calls it ‘broken’ and ‘designed for piracy’

Android App Store Criticism Piracy

Scottish app developer Matt Gemmell has written a lengthy blog post slamming Google (GOOG) for setting up Android in a way that makes app piracy insanely easy. Specifically, he says that Android’s open architecture has made it easy for users to sideload pirated apps on their devices without having to even root or “jailbreak” them first. More →

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Rock stars say Google is to blame for enabling piracy

By on July 24, 2012 at 6:35 PM.

Rock stars say Google is to blame for enabling piracy

Google Piracy Accusations

Several rock legends, including Elton John, Robert Plant and Queen guitarist Brian May, sent a letter to the Telegraph on Tuesday accusing Google (GOOG) of enabling pirates to steal their music. The letter, which was also sent to British Prime Minister David Cameron, implored both the government and the private sector to do more to protect musicians’ intellectual property rights. The letter pointed the finger at search engines such as Google for being lax in blocking sites from search results that let users download copyrighted material for free, and said that the engines must “play their part in protecting consumers and creators from illegal sites.” Seeing so many high-profile musicians come out against online piracy must be intimidating to file-sharing sites, especially since the only musical champion they can definitively count as their own is Kim Dotcom. More →

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Anti-piracy group fined for stealing music

By on July 17, 2012 at 9:55 AM.

Anti-piracy group fined for stealing music

Anti-Piracy Group Fined

Oh, the irony. A musicians’ rights group in the Netherlands was fined this week for stealing music from a client, using it without his permission and failing to pay royalties. Music royalty collection agency Buma/Stemra approached Dutch musician Melchior Rietveldt in 2006 and asked him to create a composition that would be used in an anti-piracy advertisement, which the group said would be shown exclusively at a local film festival. One year later, Rietveldt purchased a Harry Potter DVD only to find that his piece was being used on DVDs around the world without his permission. More →

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‘Copyright cop’ anti-piracy ISP system delayed once again

By on July 13, 2012 at 9:15 PM.

‘Copyright cop’ anti-piracy ISP system delayed once again

Anti-Piracy System Delayed

Internet service providers are still planning to implement their plan to kick software pirates off their networks… at some point. The Daily Dot reports that the Copyright Alerts System (CAS) being designed by major ISPs has been once again delayed despite some media reports that it was supposed to launch this week. But that doesn’t mean pirates should rest too easy since the new “copyright cop” system — which uses a “six strikes and you’re out” notification system to warn alleged pirates six separate times before their service is degraded or temporarily revoked — is still slated to come online by the end of the year. More →

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ACTA anti-piracy treaty dead following defeat in European Parliament

By on July 4, 2012 at 8:00 AM.

ACTA anti-piracy treaty dead following defeat in European Parliament

ACTA Anti-piracy Treaty Defeated

The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, or ACTA, has been defeated one last time following a European Parliament vote on Wednesday. The proposed legislation was often likened to a more comprehensive and global version of SOPA, intended to put standards in place that would protect intellectual property and combat piracy on an international scale. As TorrentFreak reports, ACTA was defeated 478 to 39 in a final European Parliament vote on Wednesday, putting an end to the proposal’s brief but tumultuous life. Lobbyists are expected to put forth new proposals in an effort to establish international IP protection similar to the measures proposed by ACTA. More →

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Woz goes to bat for Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom

By on June 26, 2012 at 1:55 PM.

Woz goes to bat for Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom

Wozniak Supports Megaupload Founder

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak has never been one to shy away from courting controversy, even when it’s at the expense of his former company. This is why it’s not too surprising that Wozniak has come out in support of Kim Dotcom, the infamous Megaupload founder last seen yukking it up on Twitter and joking about the racketeering and money laundering charges he’s currently facing. In an interview with CNET, Wozniak said that Kim had gotten a bum rap, and he accused the American government of leveling trumped-up charges against him. “When governments dream up charges of ‘racketeering’ for a typical IT guy who is just operating a file-sharing service, or accuse him of mail fraud because he said he had removed files [to alleged infringing content] when he’d just removed the links to them, this is evidence of how poorly thought out the attempt to extradite him is,” Wozniak said. Later in the interview, Wozniak acknowledged that any copyright infringement Megaupload allegedly engaged in was wrong, but he also compared it to going over the speed limit while driving. More →

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Founder of illegal movie streaming site sentenced to 4.5 years in jail, $4.7 million fine

By on June 15, 2012 at 4:25 PM.

Founder of illegal movie streaming site sentenced to 4.5 years in jail, $4.7 million fine

File-sharing Shutdown

The founder of one of Europe’s leading illegal movie-streaming portals has been sentenced to 4.5 years in jail, Deutsche Welle reports. 39-year-old Kino.to founder “Dirk B.” received a reduced sentence from a German judge this week after confessing to copyright infringement crimes related to his site, which allowed users to stream copyrighted movies illegally. Prosecutors were seeking an 11-year sentence, however the defendant’s confession and apology earned him less than half that time. Dirk B. will also have to pay a $4.7 million fine related to a sample 1.1 million instances of copyright infringement, though it is alleged that the man earned as much as $8 million from advertising on Kino.to. More →

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