Music Industry Revenues Online Piracy

Piracy isn’t destroying musicians’ ability to earn a living

By on October 8, 2013 at 11:45 PM.

Piracy isn’t destroying musicians’ ability to earn a living

Many musicians understandably hate online music piracy but there’s no evidence that it’s turning them into starving artists. Timothy Lee at The Washington Post’s Wonkblog has posted a chart using data from the London School of Economics showing that music industry revenues have remained largely flat over the past decade despite the collapse in sales of recorded music. Musicians have managed to survive by increasing the total revenues generated through concerts, which grew from $10 billion in 1998 to more than $25 billion in 2011. So while consumers are no longer as willing to pay for full CDs or even individual MP3s, they do seem willing to fork over their money to see their favorite artists in shows. Wonkblog’s chart of music revenues follows below. More →

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AT&T Piracy Account Termination

AT&T notifies pirates that their accounts can be terminated [updated]

By on September 13, 2013 at 1:45 PM.

AT&T notifies pirates that their accounts can be terminated [updated]

There might not be any evidence that the “six strikes” Copyright Alert System is having any effect on piracy, but the service providers are refusing to go down without a fight. TorrentFreak has obtained a copy of AT&T’s Copyright Infringement Alert, which states that violating the provider’s Terms of Service “could result in mitigation measures including limitation of Internet access or even suspension or termination.” The alert does not clarify what specific infringements must take place in order to warrant a complete termination of service. TorrentFreak also points out that AT&T’s policy previously ensured users that their internet would only be disconnected if a court ordered the provider to do so. The latest alert seems to indicate that this is no longer the case. More →

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Anti-Piracy Methods Fail

Study shows ‘graduated response’ anti-piracy methods are useless

By on September 11, 2013 at 6:15 PM.

Study shows ‘graduated response’ anti-piracy methods are useless

It has already been established that the “six strikes” anti-piracy system in the United States has failed to have any perceivable impact, and a recent study shows other countries are having similar difficulties controlling P2P sharing. The study was conducted by Rebecca Giblin of Monash University and dealt with whether “graduated response” measures were reducing infringement, maximizing authorized usage, or at the very least promoting a greater understanding of the effects of piracy. When piracy became a worldwide issue, governments believed that the cooperation of ISPs when punishing offenders would significantly decrease piracy rates. South Korea, France, Taiwan, and the UK have all implemented programs in an attempt to curb piracy, but according to Giblin’s study, a recent upsurge in “copyright-intensive industries” has nothing to do with graduated response efforts. Giblin concludes that “there is precious little evidence that graduated response is effective on any measure.”

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Six Strikes Piracy Rates

‘Six strikes’ Copyright Alert System has done absolutely nothing to stop piracy

By on September 5, 2013 at 12:10 PM.

‘Six strikes’ Copyright Alert System has done absolutely nothing to stop piracy

After a great deal of controversy and several extensive delays, the anti-piracy Copyright Alert System was finally implemented this February for five of leading Internet service providers in the United States. And according to TorrentFreak, the program has had no noticeable effect so far. The service providers have yet to release any information about how many of their customers are receiving alerts for torrenting copyrighted material or how effective the program has been since launching six months ago, so TorrentFreak decided to resort to exterior data to determine the program’s effectiveness. What follows is a graph of The Pirate Bay’s traffic from the beginning of 2012 through July 2013. More →

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Pirate Party Sweden IT Minister

The Pirate Party tries to get Sweden’s IT minister busted for copyright violations

By on August 8, 2013 at 8:45 PM.

The Pirate Party tries to get Sweden’s IT minister busted for copyright violations

Sweden’s Pirate Party has suddenly become very enthusiastic about enforcing copyright laws. TorrentFreak reports that the Pirate Party has found evidence that Swedish IT minister Anna-Karin Hatt has violated copyright law repeatedly by posting copyrighted Calvin and Hobbes cartoons and artwork from the Lord of the Rings films on her Instagram account. What’s more, the Pirate Party has turned its evidence over to law enforcement officials who have in the past have raided the Pirate Bay website’s servers and have arrested its founders. More →

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Spotify Music Piracy Impact

Is Spotify helping kill off music piracy?

By on July 16, 2013 at 1:20 PM.

Is Spotify helping kill off music piracy?

Artists may like griping about subscription-based music streaming services such as Spotify and Pandora, but they appear to be doing a lot to kill off music piracy. TorrentFreak reports that music piracy in Norway has completely fallen off a cliff, as data from Ipsos shows that Norwegian Internet users pirated just 210 million songs in 2012, down from 1.2 billion in 2008. The survey also shows that roughly 47% of Norwegian Internet users say that they now subscribe to a music streaming service such as Spotify, and that more than half of those subscribers pay for a premium option. Or put another way, it seems as though opening up more avenues for people to pay for music will decrease their willingness to pirate copyrighted material.

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Game Of Thrones Piracy Statistics

Game of Thrones gets pirated almost 80% more than any other show

By on June 24, 2013 at 2:35 PM.

Game of Thrones gets pirated almost 80% more than any other show

It’s a pretty good bet that HBO could expand its paying audience for Game of Thrones if it gave viewers the option to buy season passes on iTunes or Amazon like other shows do. TorrentFreak has published some pretty astonishing numbers showing that Game of Thrones’ third season premiere was downloaded illegally by roughly 5.2 million people, which is just 1.5 million fewer than the 6.7 million viewers who watched the episode the first night that it aired on HBO. What’s more, the show’s 5.2 million illegal downloads are 79% greater than The Big Bang Theory, which TorrentFreak says was the second-most pirated show in the world this past spring with 2.9 million illegal downloads.

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France Internet Anti-Piracy Law

French government decides against cutting off Internet access for alleged pirates

By on June 3, 2013 at 11:45 PM.

French government decides against cutting off Internet access for alleged pirates

Good news for French Internet users: Illegally downloading the new Daft Punk album will no longer get your Internet service cut off. Ars Technica reports that the French government has decided to do away with a provision of an anti-piracy law that allowed regulators to cut off Internet service for users who have repeatedly ignored warnings against pirating copyrighted content. Ars notes that although the government never actually cut off any alleged pirates’ Internet services, it simply didn’t think that cutting off someone’s web access should even be a viable option. Fleur Pellerin, France’s digital minister, said that “it’s not possible to cut off someone’s Internet access” because “it’s like cutting off someone’s water.”

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Google Anti Piracy Strategy

Google wants to starve pirates of revenue instead of outright blocking them

By on May 29, 2013 at 8:00 PM.

Google wants to starve pirates of revenue instead of outright blocking them

Google is getting sick and tired of the entertainment industry stamping its feet and demanding that it do more to block pirates from its search results. TorrentFreak reports that Google’s U.K. policy manager Theo Bertram said during a panel on online piracy this week that blocking links from search results is mostly a pointless exercise because there are simply so many other links that pop up in their place. The better solution, he said, would be for advertisers to give the company a list of websites where they did not want their ads to appear and ask Google to make sure that those sites are starved of advertising revenues. More →

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Arrested Development Season 4 Torrent Downloads

Not even Netflix is safe from pirates

By on May 29, 2013 at 3:30 PM.

Not even Netflix is safe from pirates

Netflix has been helping cord-cutters save money for years, offering unlimited movie and TV show streaming for just $7.99 per month. Just because the service is affordable doesn’t mean it is immune to digital piracy, however, and newly available data shows that the service took a pretty big hit earlier this week. Early on Sunday morning, Netflix released the complete fourth season of cult comedy “Arrested Development,” the latest show in Netflix’s original programming lineup. Netflix has begun to develop its own shows in an effort to attract new subscribers of course, but according to paidContent, around 100,000 people downloaded season 4 illegally within the first 24 hours alone. Many of the downloads are said to have come from markets where Netflix is currently unavailable, though firm geographical data is not available.

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IP Commission Report Computer Lockdown

Anti-piracy group says companies should mimic ransomware techniques to fight alleged pirates

By on May 27, 2013 at 12:50 PM.

Anti-piracy group says companies should mimic ransomware techniques to fight alleged pirates

A prominent anti-piracy commission, whose members include former Utah governor Jon Huntsman and former U.S. Director of National Intelligence Dennis Blair, has released a new report making the case that copyright holders should start deploying software capable of locking down the computers of alleged pirates. The new report from the Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property says that copyright holders should be allowed to take more assertive action against intellectual property thieves, including developing software that will “allow only authorized users to open files containing valuable information” and will potentially lock down any unauthorized computer that tries to access the file. More →

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Australia Game Of Thrones

American diplomat begs Australians to halt Game of Thrones piracy

By on April 26, 2013 at 9:45 PM.

American diplomat begs Australians to halt Game of Thrones piracy

America’s ambassador to Australia wants the Aussies to act more like the Lannisters and pay their debts to HBO. Australia’s News.com reports that American ambassador Jeffrey Bleich has castigated Australians for being “some of the worst offenders with among the highest piracy rates of Game of Thrones in the world.” Bleich described the large-scale piracy of Game of Thrones as an “epic theft by online viewers around the world” and said that fans of the show had no excuse for illegally streaming it because “stealing is stealing.” HBO programing president Michael Lombardo has previously said that he sees the widespread piracy of Game of Thrones as a “compliment” that has actually helped the company sell more DVDs.

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ISP Six Strikes Policy

How ISPs’ ‘six strikes’ anti-piracy program could wreak havoc on public Wi-Fi hotspots

By on January 28, 2013 at 6:53 PM.

How ISPs’ ‘six strikes’ anti-piracy program could wreak havoc on public Wi-Fi hotspots

Here’s another reason why Internet Service Providers’ plans to implement a “six strikes” anti-piracy system could be a disaster in the making: it will likely make life miserable for businesses that offer their customers free Wi-Fi connectivity. Essentially, ISPs have not yet indicated that they’ve figured out a way to avoid punishing everyone who uses a shared connection simply because one person on that connection allegedly pirated copyrighted material. What this means, as BoingBoing writes, is that “anyone operating a hotspot will quickly find that it can no longer access popular sites like YouTube and Facebook, because random users have attracted unsubstantiated copyright complaints from the entertainment industry.” More →

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