iPhone passcode security can be bypassed in less than two minutes [video]

By on March 28, 2012 at 11:45 AM.

iPhone passcode security can be bypassed in less than two minutes [video]

As a standard security measure, Apple’s iPhone can be set to require a four-digit passcode  whenever the phone’s screen is powered on in order to prevent unauthorized access. With passcode security enabled, a user’s information is theoretically kept private if his or her device ever falls into the wrong hands. A recent Forbes report reveals that law enforcement agencies can bypass the iPhone’s passcode requirement in less than two minutes, however, gaining access to all of the private data stored on the devices. Read on for more. More →

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iOS 5.0.1 bug lets users to bypass passcode and access iPhone contacts [video]

By on February 22, 2012 at 11:10 AM.

iOS 5.0.1 bug lets users to bypass passcode and access iPhone contacts [video]

A new bug has been discovered in iOS 5.0.1 that provides unauthorized access to a user’s contacts on passcode-protected iPhones. The bug, which was discovered by iPhoneIslam, is not easily reproduced and requires the attacker to have a spare SIM card or access to the victim’s phone number. The method involves inserting and ejecting the iPhone’s SIM card, which will eventually bypass the phone’s passcode and give unauthorized access to the contacts and phone app. The attacker can then make calls, view call history, view contacts and use FaceTime. The threat is seen as a somewhat minor issue that Apple will most likely fix in an upcoming iOS update. More →

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Passcode-stealing iPhone app banned by Apple

By on June 15, 2011 at 9:45 AM.

Passcode-stealing iPhone app banned by Apple

In a move that should surprise no one, Apple has banned the “Big Brother Camera Security” app that developer Daniel Amity used to swipe his customers’ passcodes. BGR reported on Tuesday about an application that attempted to trick users into setting a passcode identical to the pin used to lock their iPhones. The app then transmitted the PIN numbers in the background to the developer — albeit anonymously — who used them to publish a report covering the most commonly used iPhone passcodes. While the developer’s intentions hardly seemed malicious, there was no way Apple was going to sit back and watch while a developer published data about private PINs, even if they could not be directly tied to individual iPhone users. As such, the app has been banned from the App Store. “As of today at 4:58pm EST, Big Brother has been removed from the App Store,” Amity wrote in a blog post. “I’m certainly not happy about it, but considering the concerns a few people have expressed regarding the transfer of data from app to my server, it is understandable.” More →

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Sly developer reveals most common iPhone passcodes

By on June 14, 2011 at 5:45 PM.

Sly developer reveals most common iPhone passcodes

Daniel Amitay, the iPhone developer who created “Big Brother Camera Security” application, has released a list of the top 10 iPhone passcodes. Amity implemented code into his last software update that allowed the application to record passwords entered in by its users. Since his app’s lock and passcode screens look identical to the iPhone’s, he argues that his data reflects an iPhone user’s actual password. Of the 204,508 recorded passcodes collected, the most popular was, not surprisingly, 1234. That’s followed by 0000, 2580, 1111, 5555, 5683, 0852, 2222, 1212, and 1998. Amity says those codes represent 15% of all passwords in use. As you might expect, many of them follow simple patterns on the keyboard. “iloveyou” has always been a popular password and 5683, the No. 6 passcode on the list, can be translated into ‘LOVE’ on a standard alphanumeric keypad. Amitay also found that the numbers 1990-2000 were all in the top 50 passcodes, and 1980 – 1989 were all in the top 100, suggesting that many users may be entering in the year of their birth or graduation. Hit the jump for another chart. More →

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Fraunhofer cracks iPhone password in 6 minutes, exposes stored passwords [video]

By on February 10, 2011 at 7:27 AM.

Fraunhofer cracks iPhone password in 6 minutes, exposes stored passwords [video]

What’s the one thing that could make losing your iPhone worse? If the person who happens to find your AWOL iPhone knows exactly what they’re doing. In a two-minute video clip published by German engineering firm Fraunhofer, the company demonstrates how an iPhone’s password security can be rendered completely moot. The demonstration takes a locked, unmodified iPhone, running the latest firmware, and, with the help of jailbreaking software, gains access to all stored passwords on the device — Wi-Fi networks, saved website logins… anything stored in your keychain file. The demonstration is meant to illustrate how crucial it is for companies and individuals to not only use a pass codes on mobile devices, but also react quickly — preferably initiating a remote wipe — if the device is lost. The video demonstration is waiting for you after the break. More →

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iPhone 5 to support portable computing using NFC

By on November 1, 2010 at 3:50 PM.

iPhone 5 to support portable computing using NFC

A new report from Cult of Mac suggests that Apple may have some nifty new features in store for the upcoming iPhone 5. Rumors that the iPhone 5 will utilize NFC are nothing new at this point, but this morning’s claims cover a very unique feature for the underutilized technology. The report suggests that the iPhone 5 will include a new portable computing function, allowing users to store data and settings from Mac computers on their iPhones. When a handset is waved near any other compatible NFC-equipped Mac computer, the user’s “applications, settings and data” will become available on the computer. “It will be as though they are sitting at their own machine at home or work,” the report states. In short, the feature would provide a new type of remote computing that could eliminate the need for virtual network computing (VNC) or similar technologies. This new feature is anything but confirmed for the time being, but it certainly would be a welcome addition for Mac users. What’s more, it might help give customers with aging Mac computers an extra push to upgrade to newer NFC-enabled machines. More →

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Motorola DROID 2 security flaw allows Voice Actions from passcode-protected state

By on October 15, 2010 at 4:01 PM.

Motorola DROID 2 security flaw allows Voice Actions from passcode-protected state

One of our astute readers let us know about a bug that appears to be present in all stock, unrooted, Motorola DROID 2s (and potentially other Android 2.2 devices with BLUR). The bug allows users to execute Google Voice Actions on their device even when the handset is locked and a passcode is activated. With your DROID 2 locked, and the passcode prompt on the screen, holding the “search” softkey or keyboard-key for four seconds will — without giving the user any feedback — still trigger Google’s Voice Actions. Speaking: “Call 555-555-1234″ or “Call Home” will actually make your DROID 2 do just that (assuming “home” is in your phonebook). We couldn’t make our Nexus One or Captivate replicate the issue, so we’re assuming it is a Motorola/BLUR specific issue. Anyone out there with a DROID X running Android 2.2 able to get their handset to do the same? We’ve reached out to Motorola for comment and will update the post as soon as we hear back. There is a short video demonstrating the issue after the break. More →

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