Panasonic Toughbooks get super small

By on September 25, 2008 at 11:09 AM.

Panasonic Toughbooks get super small

For those that are in a “rougher” industry than us, you might already be carrying a Panasonic Toughbook. If you are, you’ll know that the fully-ruggedized models are pretty huge. But if you don’t require maximum roughness, Panasonic has come to market with their lightest model yet, and we’re definitely intrigued. The new Toughbook F8 is the lightest 3G-ready notebook to hit the market, but that’s not the best part. The best part, if you’ve been keeping up with all things hip, is that the 3G option is actually Qualcomm’s Gobi chip. That makes it possible to practically use any carrier in the world. Got Verizon at home but frequently travel outside the country? You’re good to go. We’ve ever heard reports of people using both Verizon and AT&T domestically depending on where they are traveling. That’s pretty hot! Here are some of the specs from the new notebook:

  • Intel® Core™ 2 Duo Processor SP9300, 2.26 GHz (6MB L2 cache, 1066 MHz FSB)
  • 1GB DDR2 SDRAM standard, expandable to 4GB
  • 160GB HDD, shock-mounted
  • Integrated DVD Multi Drive
  • 14.1″ 1280 x 800 WXGA anti-glare TFT active matrix color LCD
  • TPM Security Chip, v1.2
  • Intel® WiFi Link 5100 802.11a/b/g/draft-n
  • Genuine Windows Vista™ Business (with XP downgrade option)
  • Dimensions: 9.9″(L) x 12.8″(W) x 1.0″/1.9″ front/rear (H) (without protrusion)
  • Weight: Approximately 3.7 lbs
  • Battery life: Approximately 6 hours
  • Wireless on-off switch (WWAN, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth)
  • Bluetooth® v2.0 + EDR
  • Optional integrated Gobi(TM)  3G global mobile Internet (EV-DO and HSPA)

Now if only their tablet was this small and light… we’d be all over that! You know, since we’re going to keep mocking our Dell Latitude XT for being a piece of crap. The Panasonic F8-series is set to hit in November for an estimated street price of $2,499.

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Panasonic launches world’s first Micro Four Thirds ultralight DSLR camera

By on September 12, 2008 at 3:57 PM.

Panasonic launches world’s first Micro Four Thirds ultralight DSLR camera

Panasonic announced on Friday the 12MP Lumix DMC-G1, the world’s first camera based upon the new Micro Four Thirds standard. Announced in August by Olympus and Panasonic, the micro four thirds standard allows for reduced size and weight in both camera bodies and camera lenses by removing the mirror box from the lens design. Sacrificing a true to life optical viewfinder for a mirror-less Live View electronic viewfinder, the distance from the lens mount and the image sensor (flangeback distance) has been cut in half. The lens mount itself has also been decreased by 6mm. Smaller flangeback distance and smaller lens mount = Lighter cameras and smaller lenses. No more lugging around a 10lb gear bag as the new G1 weighs in at a mere 385 grams (0.85 lbs) and has shrunk 6-8mm in size; while still retaining the overall shape, feel, and performance of a heavier, full-bodied DSLR. Sweet! It is expected in the US in November 2008. The folks over at Imaging Resource got their hands on a pre-production model and have done a hands-on review. Click on the link to see how this new lightweight contender performs.

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Slow Sales Lead to Mass HDTV Price Cuts

By on July 16, 2008 at 1:01 PM.

Slow Sales Lead to Mass HDTV Price Cuts

As the economy continues to decline and unemployment rates continue to rise, now is a tough time for everyone. Particularly tough perhaps, if a big part of your business involves selling luxury items like HDTVs. In times of economic crisis people most often forgo big ticket items such as plasma and LCD TVs and opt to spend their money on, say, food and fuel. If you’re not one of the unlucky Americans hit hard by the current state of the union however, you might as well take advantage of some serious and wide-spread price dropping. The HDTV price cuts are manufacturer-instigated in most cases so the result will impact retailers across the country. While these new prices at major retailers still might not be the lowest you’ll find on the internet, it’s safe to assume eventually the price drops will be reflected in non-brick and mortar pricing as well. If things like a warranty and knowing for a fact that you won’t be screwed by some shady fly by night website, we say stick to the major shops and enjoy these cuts that bring most price points down to at least near-internet levels. Hit the read link to check out the full list of price drops, which includes 30 different HDTV models. The new pricing ranges from $100 off to $500 off; even up to $700 off taking a few new Best Buy sales into account.

[Via Unplggd]

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