Skyfire pulls BlackBerry Alpha

By on July 27, 2009 at 3:02 PM.

Skyfire pulls BlackBerry Alpha

We just got a heads up that because one of the alpha builds for Skyfire for BlackBerry was leaked earlier, Skyfire is taking the servers offline for the next couple weeks. Our guess is that they’re going to implement some sort of security protocol for alpha testers going forward, and you can chalk this up to leaked software ruining the world forever. Here’s the text:

“Today our alpha application was leaked. We are temporarily halting our Alpha program. As you know, we were working with a small group of you under NDA and our intent was not to open the program beyond that small number right now.

We appreciate your feedback on Alpha3, and in the next few weeks we’ll be sending you a new build to test. In the meantime, the servers will be down and you will not be able to use the application.”

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Google Android has its own app store kill switch!

By on October 17, 2008 at 8:15 AM.

Google Android has its own app store kill switch!

You know, with all the deserved hype about Android being much more open than the iPhone’s platform, one must wonder what security will be like. When iPhone developers starting coming out about Apple’s NDA on developing apps, everyone seemed to give old Steve-O the stink-eye. Add to this the fact that developers and consumers alike were complaining that Apple was remotely shutting off apps for no apparent reason. Well, it turns out there was a reason for that and Google is smart to follow suit. Being an open platform, Android could be susceptible to a world of hurt if malicious developers decided they want to mess up your phone – or worse, compromise your security. So as part of a better and safer platform, Computer world has this to say:

In the Android Market terms of service, Google expressly says that it might remotely remove an application from user phones. “Google may discover a product that violates the developer distribution agreement … in such an instance, Google retains the right to remotely remove those applications from your device at its sole discretion,” the terms, linked to from the phone, read.

We all want as little interference from the big guys as possible when enjoying our new gadgets and their apps or properties, but it’s nice to know they’re there to protect our stuff when necessary. Everyone can whine and say, “Hey man! I loved that app! Those bastards…” But our sentiment on this remote kill switch issue is – Better Safe Than Sorry.

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Apple kills NDA on iPhone app development

By on October 1, 2008 at 4:28 PM.

Apple kills NDA on iPhone app development

The latest news in the tumultuous relationship between Apple and iPhone app developers is a small victory on the developers side. It looks like Apple’s non-disclosure agreement with regards to apps build with the iPhone SDK is now officially kaput. The following is Apple’s official statement to developers:

To Our Developers

We have decided to drop the non-disclosure agreement (NDA) for released iPhone software.

We put the NDA in place because the iPhone OS includes many Apple inventions and innovations that we would like to protect, so that others don’t steal our work. It has happened before. While we have filed for hundreds of patents on iPhone technology, the NDA added yet another level of protection. We put it in place as one more way to help protect the iPhone from being ripped off by others.

However, the NDA has created too much of a burden on developers, authors and others interested in helping further the iPhone’s success, so we are dropping it for released software. Developers will receive a new agreement without an NDA covering released software within a week or so. Please note that unreleased software and features will remain under NDA until they are released.

Thanks to everyone who provided us constructive feedback on this matter.

There you have it. Apparently Apple finally came to the realization that protecting its “inventions and innovations” in exchange for hoards of bad press and aggravated developers simply wasn’t the smart path to take. Blog away, developers.

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