MIT Robot Cheetah Running

Video: Watch this incredible robotic cheetah run around untethered

By on September 16, 2014 at 10:45 PM.

Video: Watch this incredible robotic cheetah run around untethered

Remember Boston Dynamics’ robot cheetah that can run at speeds topping 28 mph on a treadmill indoors, and which now belongs to Google? Well, that’s not the only robot cheetah in town, as MIT also has developed a similar robot, MIT News reports. And as seen in an awesome new video, this crazy robotic cheetah can now run around outside without being tethered. More →

No Comments
MIT Video Recording Audio Vibrations

Future spies might not need to hear you to understand what you’re saying

By on August 4, 2014 at 6:30 PM.

Future spies might not need to hear you to understand what you’re saying

Being able to extract audio from a soundless visual recording is something that intelligence agencies will likely one day use – if they don’t already do it – for their operations. Researchers from MIT, Microsoft and Adobe have managed to create an algorithm that can reconstruct audio “by analyzing minute vibrations of objects depicted in video,” like bags of chips found in the same room with a target, as well as other objects including aluminum foil, the surface of a glass of water, and the leaves of a plant. More →

No Comments
How To Make Water From Fog

Incredible video shows MIT researchers making fresh water out of fog in the middle of a desert

By on May 16, 2014 at 9:45 PM.

Incredible video shows MIT researchers making fresh water out of fog in the middle of a desert

Living in the desert no longer has to mean being parched for drinking water. MIT has posted a video this month that shows how some researchers from its School of Engineering are working with researchers at the Pontificial University of Chile in Santiago to design a system for collecting fresh drinking water from fog that regularly rolls through Chile’s otherwise arid coastal region. More →

No Comments
MIT FingerReader Wearable Gadget

Video: Awesome tiny wearable gadget could help the blind read

By on April 18, 2014 at 12:15 AM.

Video: Awesome tiny wearable gadget could help the blind read

FingerReader is the name of a wearable gadget that could help visually impaired people read printed text in books and even on electronic devices, thus opening up additional possibilities to them. Developed by MIT researchers, FingerReader wants to help the blind access more resources than what’s already available in braille format. TechCrunch reports that, according to a recent study from the Royal National Institute of the Blind in Britain cited by one of the researchers, in 2011 only 7% of books are available in large print, unabridged audio and braille. More →

No Comments
WiTrack 3D Motion-Tracking

Video: New 3D motion-tracking system sees you through walls

By on December 12, 2013 at 2:25 PM.

Video: New 3D motion-tracking system sees you through walls

Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have come up with a radar-like 3D motion-tracking system that can spot body movement through walls, Engadget reported. Called WiTrack, the system uses wireless signals that are 100 times less powerful than usual Wi-Fi and 1,000 times less powerful than cellular signals, to track movement. Unlike similar technologies employed in some of the current gaming consoles that require the user to be in the same room with the tracking device or wear some sort of receiver, the WiTrack system works without such restrictions. More →

No Comments
MIT 110 Core Processor

MIT engineers create experimental processor with 110 cores

By on August 30, 2013 at 12:15 AM.

MIT engineers create experimental processor with 110 cores

The engineering minds at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology scoff at the eight-core processors being used in the next-generation Xbox and PlayStation consoles. PCWorld reports that MIT scientists have designed an experimental processor that has a whopping 110 cores and that purportedly makes computing vastly faster and more power efficient. The engineers designed the chip’s 110 cores to essentially replace its entire cache with a “shared memory pool” that reduces the amount of traffic inside the chips. The new processor is still in its experimental stages, however, and MIT postgraduate student Mieszko Lis tells PCWorld that “it’s not the kind of thing you buy for Christmas.”

No Comments

See-through 3D computer with gesture controls gives us a glimpse of the future [video]

By on March 28, 2012 at 10:40 AM.

See-through 3D computer with gesture controls gives us a glimpse of the future [video]

Some believe a future full of massive, gesture-controlled computer displays like the ones seen in Twentieth Century Fox’s Minority Report are an inevitability, and a prototype PC designed by an intern with the Microsoft Applied Sciences Group may be among the first steps in making that future a reality. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Ph.D student and MIT Media Lab research assistant Jinha Lee recently set out to change the way we interact with desktop computers. While progress has been made with 3D display technology, 3D has not yet proliferated in the personal computing space and Lee wants to change that. The end result of his work is a fascinating desktop computer with a transparent 3D display and a unique gesture-based interface that could change the way we use computers. More →

No Comments

MIT scientists create ultra-fast camera that can see around corners [video]

By on March 21, 2012 at 2:05 PM.

MIT scientists create ultra-fast camera that can see around corners [video]

Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created an ultra-fast camera that can see around corners, Digital Trends reported on Wednesday. Once work on the camera is complete, the team believes it can be utilized by the military to see over walls or around corners in combat zones. The camera is able to reconstruct a hidden object using scattered laser light, which bounces off walls and surfaces that are close to the obstructed object. “We are all familiar with sound echoes, but we can also exploit echoes of light,” said Ramesh Raskar, head of the Camera Culture Research Group at the MIT Media Lab. The camera is able to record an image every two picoseconds, allowing the location of the object to me measured with extreme precision. An algorithm can then process the collected data and use it to construct an image of the hidden object. The technique takes several minutes to produce an image, however the scientists hope to eventually get the entire process down to a mere 10 seconds. A video from the science journal Nature showcasing the technology follows below. More →

No Comments

Throwback Thursday: Lego Mindstorm Robotics Invention System

By on September 9, 2010 at 3:32 PM.

Throwback Thursday: Lego Mindstorm Robotics Invention System

We’re taking you back on this one… way back. Lego’s Robotics Invention System was released commercially in 1998 and was first utilized in educational settings thanks to a partnership with MIT’s Media Lab. So what did this “robotics” kit contain? Well, two motors, two touch sensors, and one light sensor. You used the included software to program the device, and it would perform completely on its own; acting according to the programmed instructions. Left, right, stop, start. If you had more than one unit, they could even “talk” to each other if they were within a certain distance. Not only could you program the brick (also known as the RCX) to perform what you wanted, but these were Legos — you could make them into whatever you wanted. Lego followed up the original Robotics Invention System with version 2.0 and, in 2006, with the NXT version. There is still pretty strong community support for these products even today. Did anyone else out there build two Lego robots and have them battling to the death?

BGR Throwback Thursday is a weekly series covering our (and your) favorite gadgets, games, and software of yesterday and yesteryear.

27 Comments

MIT unveils autonomous, oil-skimming robots

By on August 27, 2010 at 3:33 AM.

MIT unveils autonomous, oil-skimming robots

Yesterday, MIT showcased an oil-skimming, autonomous robot dubbed the Seaswarm. As the devices site explains, “Seaswarm uses a photovoltaic powered conveyor belt made of a thin nanowire mesh to propel itself and collect oil.” The robot, which is meant to hunt oil in packs (hence Seaswarm), costs around $20,000 and is powered by solar cells on the top of the device. Multiple robots can self-organize their swarm, without human support, using GPS and Wi-Fi. The device, which CNN describes as, “a treadmill conveyor belt that’s been attached to an ice cooler” drags around nanowire mesh that can absorb 20 times its weight in oil without absorbing any water. When the material is saturated with oil, it can be rolled up and left in the ocean for later pickup (it floats) or can be burned off using a heater located in the robot’s body. The nano-material used releases oil when heated to the proper temperature; which will allow skimmed oil to be recycled and repurposed. MIT estimates that 5,000 skimmers, running 24-hours a day (which they are designed to do), could have cleaned up an oil spill the size of the Gulf of Mexico in one month. MIT plans to continue researching and improving the robot over the next year before looking for a potential buyer. Not exactly mobile technology, but pretty cool technology nonetheless. We’ve got a video explaining how the device works queued up for you after the break. More →

25 Comments

WiTricity CEO talks wireless charging; preliminary availability in 12-18 months

By on July 24, 2009 at 5:38 PM.

WiTricity CEO talks wireless charging; preliminary availability in 12-18 months

Woh there George Jetson… Did you take your flying car to a remote studio on Mars to record this interview? WiTricity Corp. CEO Eric Giler sat down with the BBC for a (very) quick chat about the future of power. His vision of the future is pretty intense — where you park your electric car above a mat in your garage that powers it up while you go inside and munch on some Soylent Green wafers. We need immediate gratification however, so we’re much more interested in his cell phone charging solution for the time being. Within 12-18 months, Giler suggests that consumers will be able to purchase an accessory that will enable wireless handset charging. We’re talking truly wireless, contact-less charging here; none of this Wildcharge/Touchstone nonsense. Unfortunately, Giler danced around the all-important ‘cost to the consumer’ issue a bit, but he did seem to imply that it would be a while before WiTricity technology is affordable. Early adopters who are willing to pay a premium however, could be able to open those wallets nice and wide for some WiTricity sexiness before 2010 is through. Hit the jump for the BBC’s interview.

Thanks, Will!

More →

9 Comments