Adobe CEO says Flash feud with Apple is finished

By on June 2, 2011 at 3:15 PM.

Adobe CEO says Flash feud with Apple is finished

Speaking during the D9 conference in California on Thursday, Adobe’s CEO, Shantanu Narayen said that his company’s feud with Apple, which was a result of Cupertino’s decision to omit support for Flash in its products, has come to an end. “Yes, the argument is over from our point of view,” Narayen said. “We are so excited about opportunities we have. We’re focused on that.” He added that Adobe welcomes, and is contributing to, the new HTML5 standard. Apple’s argument, which has been backed by many developers, is that HTML5 is more efficient than Flash — particularly when it comes to battery consumption — for presenting and viewing streaming video and other multimedia content. “At the end of the day, where Adobe makes its money is through our application tools, as well as our solutions, (and) being able to make that content and measure that content and manage that content,” Narayen told The Wall Street Journal. More →

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RIM announces BlackBerry 7; brings HTML 5, BlackBerry Balance to handsets [Updated]

By on May 2, 2011 at 9:01 AM.

RIM announces BlackBerry 7; brings HTML 5, BlackBerry Balance to handsets [Updated]

Included in the company’s barrage of press releases this morning, Research In Motion officially announced BlackBerry 7. The new smartphone operating system — formerly known as BlackBerry 6.1 — brings HTML 5 and a new Just-In-Time (JIT) JavaScript engine to the browser, along with BlackBerry Balance support, enhanced universal search, and a new “Liquid Graphics” theme. BlackBerry 7 will debut on the recently announced BlackBerry Bold 9900/9930 — the company did not, however, mention if older hardware would be upgraded to the new code.

UPDATE: RIM has confirmed that BlackBerry devices currently in-market will not be upgraded to BlackBerry 7.

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Google launches Cloud Print for Android, iOS

By on January 24, 2011 at 3:49 PM.

Google launches Cloud Print for Android, iOS

Google announced a service called Cloud Print last year that enables users to print wirelessly and remotely from within Gmail and Google Docs. Though the service hasn’t garnered much media attention, it shows a great deal of potential and it removes some of the barriers associated with wireless printing. On Monday, Google announced that it is making the Cloud Print service available on its HTML5-based Gmail and Google Docs mobile sites. Users of the iPhone, iPad, Android 2.1+ devices and other devices with browsers that support HTML5 will soon be able to access the service from anywhere there is a data connection. Unlike Apple’s wireless AirPrint solution, Google’s Cloud Print does not require devices to be on the same network in order to utilize the service. It also doesn’t require a special printer like AirPrint, though a Windows PC is required to configure the service. Cloud Print for mobile will be rolled out to users in the U.S. this week as a beta service. More →

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Microsoft sides with Apple, embraces H.264 as HTML5 web video standard

By on April 30, 2010 at 2:27 PM.

Microsoft sides with Apple, embraces H.264 as HTML5 web video standard

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Outside of the debate on the future of Flash and Flash video on the Internet is a separate but related battle over the video standard that will be supported by HTML5. On one side of the battle line is Firefox and Opera which has pledged support for the Ogg Theora video standard, and on the other side is Apple which has been pushing for H.264. Apple is no longer alone in this fight and now has an unlikely ally in Microsoft which announced on Thursday that IE 9 will support H.264 for HTML5 video. Ogg supporters are understandably disappointed with this decision as the two computing giants may now have the combined power to squash Ogg Theora support in these other browser platforms. Look for things to get messier before they get better as Google is expected to debut its own On2-derived V8 video protocol at Google I/O next month. More →

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Microsoft announces Internet Explorer 9

By on March 17, 2010 at 6:13 AM.

Microsoft announces Internet Explorer 9

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MIX10 is going strong and this year, the Microsoft conference has been filled with big announcements. Yesterday, we learned about Windows Phone 7 Series development and today, we get a glimpse of what is coming in Internet Explorer 9. The latest web browser from Microsoft stays competitive by supporting several HTML 5 specifications including CSS3, Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG), XHTML parsing, and both embedded H.264/MPEG4 video and MP3/AAC audio. Microsoft’s latest web browser also includes a new and improved JavaScript engine that combined with its GPU-accelerated graphics promises to deliver a rich browsing experience. You can test drive the latest browser via an online demo over at Microsoft’s new IE9 website or, if you enjoy living life on the edge of a system collapse, you can download and install the Internet Explorer 9 platform preview. More →

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Does Adobe Flash actually outperform HTML 5?

By on March 11, 2010 at 2:01 PM.

Does Adobe Flash actually outperform HTML 5?

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The battle between HTML 5 and Flash wages on with the discovery of an interesting report comparing the CPU usage of HTML 5 and Flash on both Mac and Windows platform. In the midst of all the smack talk about Flash, Flash was presumed to be a CPU hog that chokes your system to the point of death. A series of measurements performed by video compression guru Jan Ozer reveals that Flash may not be as much of a CPU killer as previously thought and that, in some cases, HTML 5 is the culprit that causes CPU overload. Ozer tested HTML 5 and Flash on a Mac using Safari, Chrome and Firefox and on a Windows machine using Safari, Chrome, Firefox and Internet Explorer.

The results show that Flash CPU utilization is much higher on a Mac with Flash 10.1 gobbling up 32.07 CPU % points when using Safari, 42.07 when using Firefox and a whopping 49.79 when using Chrome. Flash 10.1 was much gentler on the Windows machine with CPU utilization topping out a reasonable 14.63 CPU % points when using IE and dropping as low as 6% when using Firefox. HTML 5 results were all over the chart with HTML 5 consuming a mere 12.39 CPU % points in Safari, presumably due to the built-in H.264 decoding found in the Apple browser, while at the same time, chomping down a staggering 49.89 in the Mac version of Chrome. The Windows platform fared a bit better with Chrome using 25.66% CPU points when rendering HTML 5 content. In the end, Flash is markedly better on Windows (which we already knew) and HTML 5 shines in the Safari for the Mac but why is there such a disparity between the two platforms? Hit the jump to find out. More →

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Adobe confirms Flash for iPhone in the works; Apple is assisting

By on February 1, 2009 at 3:17 PM.

Adobe confirms Flash for iPhone in the works; Apple is assisting

Steve Jobs once said that Flash on the iPhone would be a bad move as it is extremely resource heavy and that Flash Lite doesn’t have what it takes to make for an enjoyable web experience. Adobe on the other hand, wasn’t all that interested in what Steve said because it was only a few months ago it signaled its intentions to bring Flash to the iPhone. The problem was Apple wasn’t involved in the process and it was highly unlikely that it would approve anything to do with Flash unless it was directly involved in the process. This week in Switzerland, Adobe’s CEO Shantanu Narayen was feeling pretty talkative and finally let the official cat out of the bag by saying that both Adobe and Apple are working together to make Flash a reality for the iPhone platform. Admitting the process of porting a reliable version of Flash to the iPhone is no easy task, Narayen was confident that having both Adobe and Apple work on the project together would be the key to success. One of the largest questions that remains is whether or not Flash will be coded into the iPhone’s firmware or if it will be a specific Flash-enabled web browser available in the App Store. The latter, however, is highly unlikely given the fact that the two companies are finally working together – you can be sure Apple won’t let Adobe steal the spotlight.

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