Hacker claims to have accessed 50,000 accounts from Wall Street IT recruiting firm

By on July 19, 2012 at 9:15 PM.

Hacker claims to have accessed 50,000 accounts from Wall Street IT recruiting firm

ITWallStreet.com Hacked 50,000 Accounts

An Internet hacker belonging to a group called TeamGhostShell broke into recruiting website ITWallStreet.com, Computer World reported. The information compromised, which includes full names, mailing addresses, email addresses, usernames, hashed passwords and phone numbers, was posted online on Thursday, and thousands of hashed passwords have reportedly already been decrypted. The leaked data also includes details such as salary and bonus expectations of the potential employees and even feedback on specific candidates. Another file contained email conversations and thousands of phone call records between recruiters and potential candidates. The hacker behind the breach, known only as Masakaki, suggested the attack was meant as a sign of support for the Occupy Wall Street movement. Andiamo Partners, the New York-based recruiting firm that operates the website, did not confirm or deny the breach. More →

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‘Anonymous’ hacker group declares war on pedophiles [video]

By on July 16, 2012 at 10:15 PM.

‘Anonymous’ hacker group declares war on pedophiles [video]

Anonymous Operation Pedochat

The U.S. Government and various global authorities label “Anonymous” as cyberterrorist and criminals, but others refer to the group as freedom fighters and protectors of free speech. The notorious hackers’ most recent operation, however, may change some people’s opinions of them. Anonymous has declared war on the deepest and most twisted parts of the Internet — chat sites used by paedophiles to trade images. More →

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Anonymous urges public to protest the European Union and INDECT [video]

By on June 18, 2012 at 5:35 PM.

Anonymous urges public to protest the European Union and INDECT [video]

Anonymous Hackers Protest European Union

Notorious hacker-activist group Anonymous is back with another operation that aims to strike fear into the hearts of lawmakers in the European Union. While the operation does not involve any cyberattacks, Anonymous is attempting to rally supporters for a massive protest on July 28th. The group is protesting the EU-backed research project INDECT, which looks to develop technology that can automatically detect criminal threats by analyzing conspicuous behavior online and in real life through various surveillance measures. Opponents of the project contend that it is an invasion of privacy that collects data illegally. “We have been accepting the claims of disclosure of our private data for too long in order to prevent acts of terrorism,” Anonymous said in a video posted on YouTube. “People started to accept being treated as potential terrorists or criminals, being more and more deprived of their basic rights, and allowing the surveillance society to gain increased control over them.” Anonymous’s video follows below. More →

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Hacked companies start hacking back

By on June 18, 2012 at 3:25 PM.

Hacked companies start hacking back

Anti-Hacker Retaliation New Policies

More companies are risking escalating retaliation with the hacker community by directly going after hackers who break into their systems, Reuters reports.The publication describes the new techniques as “active defense” or “strike-back” policies that use deception to either distract the target hacker with misinformation or to get the hacker to inadvertently reveal more about themselves and their machines. For example, Reuters notes that some companies create “beacons” that contain false information and are then traced back to hackers’ machines once they’re extracted. More →

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Alleged LulzSec hacker indicted for media site breaches

By on June 14, 2012 at 1:10 PM.

Alleged LulzSec hacker indicted for media site breaches

LulzSec Hacker Indicted

An alleged LulzSec hacker won’t be having many more lulz if he’s thrown in jail. Per the Los Angeles Times, 20-year-old British man Ryan Cleary has been indicted by a federal grand jury in Los Angeles for allegedly hacking into several major media websites including the sites for the Fox reality show “The X-Factor” and PBS’s “News Hour.” Cleary hacked into the sites to either deface them or steal peoples’ personal data, the indictment alleges, and he could face up to 25 years in prison if convicted. In all, Cleary faces one count of conspiracy and two counts of the unauthorized impairment of protected computers. More →

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Dark side of ‘Anonymous’ comes out in new interview

By on June 13, 2012 at 1:15 PM.

Dark side of ‘Anonymous’ comes out in new interview

Anonymous Hackers Interview

It’s no mystery that the hackers behind notorious “hacktivist” groups Anonymous and LulzSec cause a tremendous amount of trouble for the companies and agencies they target, but thousands of young web users cheer them on with the belief that these groups are fighting for Internet freedom around the world. According to a recent profile, however, this isn’t always the case. In a rare in-depth interview with Anonymous members, The Daily Beast’s Parmy Olson uncovers the dark side of Anonymous, likening the divide between the group’s activist members and its pranksters to Batman and the Joker. While some Anonymous members indeed look to topple oppressors, others simply “try to cause chaos, lulz, whatever to have fun.” And while many hacker activists continue to fight the good fight, as they view it, the more playful Anonymous hackers are skeptical that they will ever really make a difference. “I don’t think [Anonymous] can change much in the world,” one group member told The Daily Beast. Parmy’s full interview is linked below. More →

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Last.fm says user passwords were leaked

By on June 7, 2012 at 2:05 PM.

Last.fm says user passwords were leaked

Last.fm Passwords Hacked Leaked

Custom Internet radio provider Last.fm on Thursday confirmed that passwords belonging to an unspecified number of it users have been compromised. “We are currently investigating the leak of some Last.fm user passwords,” the company said in a statement on its website. “This follows recent password leaks on other sites, as well as information posted online. As a precautionary measure, we’re asking all our users to change their passwords immediately.” The news comes just one day after LinkedIn confirmed an attack that saw passwords belonging to nearly 6.5 million members posted on the Web. Last.fm recommends that all of its users change their passwords immediately. More →

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What it's like to get hacked

By on June 7, 2012 at 12:15 PM.

What it's like to get hacked

Hacked Insider Account

With “hacktivist” groups like Anonymous and stories like the LinkedIn security breach constantly popping up in the news, it’s easy to grow numb to matters of digital security despite their seriousness. Individuals, businesses and even governments are vulnerable, and while the public is often privy to one side of the story thanks to security conferences and outspoken hacker groups, personal accounts of how the individuals responsible for protecting the networks, websites and devices that get hacked are few and far between. More →

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'Anonymous' hackers release 1.7GB of stolen DOJ data

By on May 22, 2012 at 4:00 PM.

'Anonymous' hackers release 1.7GB of stolen DOJ data

Anonymous DOJ Hack

Hackers associated with well known hacker-activist group “Anonymous Operations” have released a massive cache of data they say was obtained when they hacked a website belonging to the United States Department of Justice. “Today we are releasing 1.7GB of data that used to belong to the United States Bureau of Justice, until now,” Anonymous wrote in a statement on its website. The hackers claim the file contains emails as well as “the entire database dump” from the DOJ website. More →

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U.S. House passes CISPA

By on April 26, 2012 at 7:00 PM.

U.S. House passes CISPA

The United States House of Representatives has voted to pass the controversial Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), talk of which has swept the Internet over the past few weeks. The House vote was moved up to Thursday night, and CISPA passed as 248 members of Congress voted for the bill and 168 voted against. The bill is sponsored by Representatives Mike Rogers (R-Michigan) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Maryland), and it now faces further modifications in the Senate if it is to avoid being vetoed by the White House. President Barack Obama has indicated that he intends to veto the bill if it makes it to his desk, noting that as it is written now, the legislation would allow “broad sharing of information with governmental entities without establishing requirements for both industry and the government to minimize and protect personally identifiable information.” The American Civil Liberties Union issued a statement following the vote. “Cybersecurity does not have to mean abdication of Americans’ online privacy,” said ACLU legislative counsel Michelle Richardson. “As we’ve seen repeatedly, once the government gets expansive national security authorities, there’s no going back. We encourage the Senate to let this horrible bill fade into obscurity.” More →

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Thousands rally against CISPA cybersecurity bill

By on April 26, 2012 at 12:45 PM.

Thousands rally against CISPA cybersecurity bill

The controversial Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), which is supported by more than 100 members of the House of Representatives, is scheduled to be discussed in Congress on Friday, where it will be the first bill to go to a vote since the collapse of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) in January. The bill looks to give businesses and the federal government legal protection to share cyber threats with one another in an effort to prevent online attacks. Internet privacy and neutrality advocates, such as the Electronic Frontier Foundation, feel the bill does not contain enough limits on how and when the government may monitor private information, however, and they fear that such power may be used to locate and punish file sharers and those who infringe on copyrights rather than hackers. More →

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Malware found to steal credit card data from hotel payment systems

By on April 20, 2012 at 8:20 PM.

Malware found to steal credit card data from hotel payment systems

Security firm Trusteer warned this week of a trojan that is capable of stealing an individual’s credit card information from hotels. The firm’s intelligence team discovered the remote access trojan being sold on underground forums for $280. The malware is designed to capture screenshots from point-of-sale applications that access credit card numbers and expiration dates. These systems are located on front-desk computers at hotels, and they are often unmanaged and do not contain anti-virus protections software that would stop a trojan of this type. The malware’s creators also include instructions on how to use VoIP-based social engineering to trick front-desk clerks into installing the trojan. More →

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Visa drops Global Payments following theft of 1.5 million card numbers

By on April 2, 2012 at 6:35 PM.

Visa drops Global Payments following theft of 1.5 million card numbers

Following a massive security breach, Visa has dropped Global Payments from its registry of providers that meet data security standards, The Associated Press reported on Monday. Global Payments CEO Paul Garcia said that the company will continue to process Visa transactions, however being dropped from the registry “could give our partners some pause that they’re doing business with someone who experienced a breach.” Garcia fully expects his company to be reinstated once it has been issued a new report of compliance, although he declined to specify when that might happen. The CEO maintains that the situation is “absolutely contained” and is being fully investigated. Global Payments confirmed on Sunday that hackers stole credit card numbers belonging to as many as 1.5 million MasterCard and Visa customers, however cardholder names, addresses and Social Security numbers were not compromised. The company plans to set up a website to assist consumers who might have been affected by the breach. More →

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