‘Anonymous’ hacker group releases its own desktop OS [updated]

By on March 14, 2012 at 2:10 PM.

‘Anonymous’ hacker group releases its own desktop OS [updated]

Notorious hacker group “Anonymous Operations” on Wednesday released the first version of its own desktop operating system. Dubbed Anonymous-OS, the computer platform is built on top of the open-source Linux-based Ubuntu 11.10 operating system, and it also utilizes the open-source Mate desktop environment, The Hacker News reports. It is unclear exactly who is behind the operating system, which comes with a number of tools pre-installed that are apparently Anonymous-approved. Included are Anonymous HOIC, John the Ripper, SQL Poison and more. Version 0.1 of the hacker group’s Anonymous-OS is free and available immediately for download, though readers should obviously exercise caution.

UPDATE: The Anonymous-OS Tumblr blog states that the group’s operating system is “created for educational purposes, to checking the security of web pages,” and the page suggests that users should not “use any tool to destroy any web page.”

UPDATE 2: Anonymous says this OS is fake, not affiliated with their group, and packed with malware. More →

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Hackers tried to extort $50,000 from Symantec after stealing source code

By on February 7, 2012 at 11:15 AM.

Hackers tried to extort $50,000 from Symantec after stealing source code

A group of hackers demanded that Symantec pay $50,000 to prevent it from releasing stolen source code for several of the firm’s software titles. Symantec reportedly confirmed that it was cooperating with a sting operation while communicating via email with a group of hackers claiming ties to notorious hacktivist group “Anonymous.” Those ties have not been confirmed. The email conversation was posted to Pastebin on Monday, and a Symantec representative confirmed to CNET that the emails were authentic. Read on for more. More →

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Ultimate hack: LulzSec may have duped British authorities into arresting innocent man

By on July 28, 2011 at 12:11 PM.

Ultimate hack: LulzSec may have duped British authorities into arresting innocent man

Following reports on Wednesday that British police had arrested a 19-year-old suspect thought to be the spokesperson of notorious hacker group “LulzSec,” new information suggests authorities may have been duped into arresting an innocent man. According to DailyTech, a hacker by the name of “The Jester” has discovered and published chat logs that suggest “Topiary,” the hacker reportedly arrested by authorities on Wednesday, is still at large. According to the exposed chat, Sweden-born Daniel Ackerman Sandberg — the alleged real LulzSec spokesperson — recently assumed the online identity of another man in an effort to mislead authorities. Sandberg, who has reportedly changed his name numerous times, is also said to have been caught on video speaking Swedish, further suggesting that the Scottish man arrested Wednesday by British authorities was not in fact LulzSec’s spokesperson. The full alleged chat logs between Sandberg and an anonymous second party can be read below (emphasis applied by DailyTech). More →

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Apple laptops can be hacked to self-destruct; flaw to be detailed by hacker next month

By on July 26, 2011 at 6:35 PM.

Apple laptops can be hacked to self-destruct; flaw to be detailed by hacker next month

How’s this for an undocumented feature? Apple’s newer MacBook, MacBook Air and MacBook Pro notebooks have a security flaw that can allow hackers to remotely prevent the batteries from charging. Better yet, hackers can exploit the same flaw and remotely cause batteries to explode. Apple laptops’ new “smart” battery technology is intended to provide added control over power management, and it does just that. Unfortunately, it also gives hackers added control because the microcontroller chip that ships in recent Apple laptops can be accessed remotely using a default password shared by each and every notebook. Charlie Miller, the security expert who discovered the vulnerability, plans to showcase the flaw next month at the Black Hat security conference. There, Miller will show that he is able to access the battery controller remotely and cause it to refuse a charge, or even heat up until it catches fire and explodes. “These batteries just aren’t designed with the idea that people will mess with them,” Miller told Forbes last week. “What I’m showing is that it’s possible to use them to do something really bad.” Thankfully, the security expert also intends to showcase a fix for the flaw, which Apple will hopefully implement as soon as possible. More →

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Second hacker indicted over stolen AT&T iPad data

By on July 7, 2011 at 2:30 PM.

Second hacker indicted over stolen AT&T iPad data

An Arkansas man has been indicted for carrying out a cyberattack on AT&T servers that resulted in the theft of personal data from more than 100,000 iPad users. Andrew Auernheimer has been charged by a New Jersey grand jury with one count of conspiracy to gain unauthorized access to computers and one count of identity theft, Reuters reports. Auernheimer’s codefendant Daniel Spitler entered a guilty plea after being charged with the same crimes late last month. Court documents recount several conversations Auernheimer allegedly had surrounding the AT&T breach, and the evidence appears to be damning. “If we get 1 reporters address with this somehow we instantly have a story,” he wrote to Spitler on June 6, 2010, according to the indictment. “HI I STOLE YOUR EMAIL FROM AT&&T WANT TO KNOW HOW?” Auernheimer later continued, “The more email addresses we get … the more of a freakout we can cause.” Both Auernheimer and Spitler are said to be associated with “Goatse Security,” a hacker group reportedly focused on disrupting online content and services. More →

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Apple becomes latest ‘Anonymous’ hacker target

By on July 4, 2011 at 11:20 AM.

Apple becomes latest ‘Anonymous’ hacker target

Notorious hacker collective “Anonymous Operations” on Sunday published data it claims to have obtained by breaching a server belonging to Apple. The data, which consisted of 27 usernames and passwords, was allegedly taken during from surveys stored on an Apple server. Though the group said on one of its Twitter accounts that it is “busy elsewhere,” and therefore will seemingly not be targeting Apple again in the near future, it claims to have exploited a security flaw common to several companies when it gained access to Apple’s server. Anonymous said the breach was part of its AntiSec movement, short for anti-security, which is aimed at “exposing corporate and government data and humiliating security firms.” More →

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‘Anonymous’ launches WikiLeaks for hackers: HackerLeaks

By on July 1, 2011 at 12:28 PM.

‘Anonymous’ launches WikiLeaks for hackers: HackerLeaks

The infamous group of “hacktivists” known as Anonymous Operations on Thursday launched a new tool to aid its digital crusade against targeted governments and corporations. Dubbed “HackerLeaks,” the new site is a tool hackers can use to distribute data anonymously, and it adopts the model popularized by WikiLeaks. Hacker groups like the now-defunct LulzSec used a variety of tools to disseminate the spoils of their cyberattacks, but Anonymous explains that their tool has a number of benefits. “Anonymous and the [People’s Liberation Front] have already established connections to the media outlets that can help better expose important data, and that they hope to also provide ‘unique and enlightening analysis,’” the group said in a statement. HackerLeaks it the latest addition to Anonymous’ movement known as “AntiSec,” which is aimed at “exposing corporate and government data and humiliating security firms.” More →

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LulzSec’s last lulz: Malware for all those who downloaded hackers’ final plunder

By on June 28, 2011 at 12:30 PM.

LulzSec’s last lulz: Malware for all those who downloaded hackers’ final plunder

The small group of hackers known as Lulz Security, or simply “LulzSec,” would never disband without one final round of fun. BGR reported on Monday that the group’s reign of terror was coming to an end after 50 lul-filled days. During that period of time, LulzSec released data stolen in a series of online breaches with targets ranging from Sony to the U.S. Government. In its coup de grâce, LulzSec released a stash of stolen data from a variety of targets, including AT&T, Disney and the U.S. Navy. But data obtained through online breaches wasn’t the only thing LulzSec stuffed into the file; a directory named “BootableUSB” also contained a variety of malware including trojans and worms. While “LulzSec” is no more and its notorious Twitter account now sits dormant, members of the well-known hacktivism group “Anonymous Operations” have confirmed that LulzSec is gone in name only — the six LulzSec members have been absorbed by Anonymous, according to the group’s official Twitter feed. More →

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Citigroup hackers stole $2.7 million in recent breach

By on June 27, 2011 at 6:50 PM.

Citigroup hackers stole $2.7 million in recent breach

A recent online security breach involving the left of 360,000 credit card numbers will cost Citigroup $2.7 million, the company confirmed to U.S. government officials on Monday. Hackers infiltrated Citigroup servers last month and stole account numbers and personal information associated with over 360,000 Citi-branded credit cards. According to Citigroup, personal information and card numbers from approximately 3,400 cardholders was subsequently used to make about $2.7 million in unauthorized purchases. Citigroup stated that affected customers would be reimbursed for the fraudulent charges. No arrests have been made in association with the breach. More →

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LulzSec hacked, exposed by rival hackers [updated]

By on June 22, 2011 at 11:31 AM.

LulzSec hacked, exposed by rival hackers [updated]

LulzSec isn’t making any friends in the U.S. government or within any of the numerous companies that own the websites it has hacked, and apparently the group has managed to rub a few other hackers the wrong way as well. A website said to belong to a Dutch member of the hacker group LulzSec has reportedly been hacked by another group known as “TeaMp0isoN.” The site has since been taken down, but not before a 17-year-old TeaMp0isoN member was able to infiltrate it and post a statement. “Stop telling yourself that u are hackers, putting a ip into a irc is NOT hacking nor is using pre-made tools and scripts to grab databases,” the statement read. “You do not represent the anti-sec movement, u are not allowed to greet underground groups like zf0, ab, h0n0, el8 like your member ‘AnonSabu’ was doing, you will never be apart of the underground scene, if anyone thinks you are underground and can actually hack they have no idea about what happens in the underground scene.” The hacker went on to state that he plans to expose pictures, addresses, passwords, IP addresses and phone numbers belonging to members of LulzSec. TeaMp0isoN’s full statement follows below.

UPDATE: The Dutch owner of the aforementioned hacked website, Sven Swootleg, denies any involvement with LulzSec. His full statement now be found below, beneath TeaMp0isoN’s statement. More →

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LulzSec denies reports of leader’s arrest

By on June 21, 2011 at 2:39 PM.

LulzSec denies reports of leader’s arrest

There are numerous reports claiming that the leader of the now infamous hacking group LulzSec has been arrested in the United Kingdom. According to London’s Metropolitan Police, the shadowy leader was a 19-year old responsible for hacking “a number of international businesses and intelligence agencies.” The group took responsibility for Sony’s recent massive security breach and has also targeted a number of high-visibility websites, including that of the Central Intelligence Agency, and has waged war on the U.S. government with another group dubbed Anonymous. Despite the reports, however, LulzSec has denied that any of its members have been arrested. Early Tuesday morning the group tweeted: “Seems the glorious leader of LulzSec got arrested, it’s all over now… wait… we’re all still here! Which poor b****** did they take down?” More →

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New website answers the question on all our minds: Has Sony been hacked this week?

By on June 13, 2011 at 11:45 AM.

New website answers the question on all our minds: Has Sony been hacked this week?

BGR has provided extensive coverage of an ongoing saga that has seen numerous digital properties belonging to Sony fall under attack. To date, personal information belonging to well over 100 million Sony customers has been compromised, and nearly 13 million credit card numbers have been stolen. For IT professionals or other tech enthusiasts with weak stomachs, we can understand if reading one story after another about Sony’s security woes might make you a bit queasy. As such, a new site launched recently that has you covered. Hassonybeenhackedthisweek.com answers a single question for those who simply want to cut to the chase: Has Sony been hacked this week? The answer right now, by the way, is “yes.” More →

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Sony suffers yet another breach; Sony Music Brazil site hacked

By on June 6, 2011 at 9:31 AM.

Sony suffers yet another breach; Sony Music Brazil site hacked

The list of hacked Sony properties continues to grow as Sony Music Brazil finds its website the latest victim in a long line of breaches. The company’s website was the target of a cyberattack on Saturday night and nearly 36 hours later, the site is still offline. Initially, the hackers defaced the site with a single page titled “Hacked The UnderTaker,” which apparently contained nicknames of several people responsible for the attack. More than 12 hours later, the website was finally taken offline. Sony Music Brazil has not commented on the breach and it is unclear if any private data was exposed. More →

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