Verizon Android devices get FiOS Mobile

By on January 19, 2010 at 9:55 AM.

Verizon Android devices get FiOS Mobile

Verizon couch potatoes throw your hands up! If you have a DROID or Eris on Verizon, and you’re a FiOS customer, you can get FiOS Mobile on your phone now. You can check TV listings, adjust parental controls, set your DVR and even check out Videos On Demand with the new mobile application. Verizon also included a nifty little storage space indicator to let you know when it’s time to delete those episodes of Jersey Shore that you’ve already seen a dozen times. Let us know how it works out for you, will you? More →

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Verizon responds to Cablevision's Optimum Ultra service

By on April 30, 2009 at 9:10 AM.

Verizon responds to Cablevision's Optimum Ultra service

Honestly, we absolutely love it when a company ignores its instincts along with the onslaught of advice from its PR firm and talks, err, smack. Despite what some flacks may tell you, people want to hear it like it is and sometimes PR-ified nonsense does more harm than good. Then again, sometimes the opposite is true. Like this time, for instance. Verizon has publicly responded to Cablevision’s new $99 Optimum Ultra 101Mbps residential Internet service in much the same manner a preteen with a hand-me-down Sega Genesis would respond to one touting a brand new Xbox 360. If you’d like to forgo reading Verizon’s response, here are the key points found within:

  • Cablevision’s network is old.
  • Delivering 101Mbps is easy.
  • If a few people in the same neighborhood are heavy Ultra users, it will rip a hole in the space time continuum
  • People don’t want fast Internet service
  • Verizon can offer speeds waaaaaaay faster than 101Mbps — we just don’t want to
  • Optimum Ultra’s upstream is 15Mbps and we offer 20Mbps [in the $150/month package]
  • Most servers you hit on the Internet are way slower than 100 Mbps
  • Cablevision just wants bragging rights
  • Nanny nanny poo poo

While there is a valid point or two buried deep within the ‘we’re better but we choose not to be’ cries, the bottom line is that this was the wrong approach to take. Wrong. Verizon first contends that there is no demand for faster Internet service in the home, then concludes with the canned “the future is gonna be faaaaaast” claim. Well, Verizon, the future isn’t going to be fast unless service providers take incremental steps toward making it so.

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Optimum Online announces Ultra service, 101Mbps/15Mbps for $99

By on April 28, 2009 at 12:01 AM.

Optimum Online announces Ultra service, 101Mbps/15Mbps for $99

If you’re a Cablevision subscriber with a need for more bandwidth, you’re in for a real treat. Like, you might need to change your pants. Just announced a few seconds ago is Optimum Online’s new Ultra service. This takes their existing Boost service to a whole new level. Want to know how fast? How about 101Mbps downstream and 15Mbps upstream. Fast enough? Well, it’s now the fastest residential internet service in the entire country. Even better is the fact that come May 11th, the Ultra service will be available to every single Cablevision subscriber across their entire service area. You might be wondering what the pricing will be on this… it’s going to be available for $99 a month. Existing subs are paying around $60/month for Boost at 30Mbps/5Mbps and Verizon’s FIOS service is around $150/mo for 50Mbps/20Mbps — seems incredibly fair right? Think of all the DiVx movies, applications, games you could...

Hey Verizon, you just got pooped on.

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Verizon to roll out 100Mbps FIOS in 2009

By on December 6, 2008 at 8:49 AM.

Verizon to roll out 100Mbps FIOS in 2009

fiber opticAccording to Vincent O’Byrne, Verizon’s technology director, Verizon is planning to roll out 100Mbps FIOS in 2009. This move will expand the ultra high speed network beyond its limited test market which has been enjoying 100Mbps for at least a year now. With Comcast deploying DOCSIS 3.0 and upping the speeds it offers to 50Mbps in many markets, the pressure is on Verizon to maintain its competitive speed advantage, from a marketing standpoint at least. In the past, Verizon has made it clear that it views the 100Mbps speed threshold as a “sexy” marketing strategy, not a real necessity for most customers and that the driving force behind these speed increases is not customer demand but competitive marketing tactics. As long as it continues to up the ante and provide quality service, we don’t care whether it is the marketing team or consumers who are in driver’s seat. All we want is ample bandwidth to be able to stream Netflix HD, backup to Jungle Disk, video chat on skype, download the latest game demos and play COD4 on Xbox 360 all at the same time.

[Via DSl Reports]

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