Facial Recognition Thermal

The future is here: New face recognition technology can work in the dark

By on July 31, 2015 at 6:30 PM.

The future is here: New face recognition technology can work in the dark

It’s kind of crazy how quickly face detection and recognition technology managed to push its way into the mainstream. Over the past few years we’ve seen face recognition technology reach desktop photo software like iPhoto and even mass market smartphones from the likes of Samsung. And of course, there are no shortage of stories centering on government agencies who use face recognition technology for identification and surveillance purposes.

Setting the bar even higher, researchers from Germany have reportedly developed a new technology that allows facial recognition software to identify faces even in the dark. Whereas traditional facial recognition software involves the comparison of two photos, both of which must be taken in well-lit environments, the approach German computer scientists came up with involves using a person’s thermal signature.

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Facial Recognition Tech

Facial recognition tech: Privacy, best practices on Obama’s agenda

By on December 4, 2013 at 10:00 PM.

Facial recognition tech: Privacy, best practices on Obama’s agenda

The National Telecommunication & Information Administration (NTIA) on Tuesday announced that it plans to hold a variety of meetings next year, starting in early February, to discuss the use of facial recognition technology in modern devices. The NTIA will also look to develop a “voluntary, enforceable code of conduct that specifies how the Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights applies” for the technology. More →

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Facial Analysis Technology Students

New facial analysis tech knows when students are struggling in class

By on July 2, 2013 at 11:59 PM.

New facial analysis tech knows when students are struggling in class

It’s just what you always wanted when you were a kid: A computer that tracks your every facial move and lets your teacher know when you’re struggling with a given assignment. Technology Review reports that researchers at North Carolina State University have been using computers’ cameras to watch students’ emotional states in an effort to help teachers understand when they’re having difficulty with a particular problem. NC State researcher Joseph Grafsgaard tells Technology Review that his goal with the project is to help struggling students “bolster their confidence and keep them motivated” so that they don’t fall behind their peers. The report also notes that this sort of research is part of a broader trend of “affective computing” projects that “measure skin conductance” or “assess voice tone or facial expressions” to record users’ emotional states.

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