Verizon launches mobile recovery application for Android, BlackBerry, Palm, and Windows Mobile

By on September 20, 2010 at 9:31 PM.

Verizon launches mobile recovery application for Android, BlackBerry, Palm, and Windows Mobile

Remember that Verizon phone recovery service we told you about five days ago? Well… today, Verizon has made it a reality; albeit four days later than predicted. Via a press release, Big Red announced Mobile Recovery, “a web-and phone-based application that can help customers in the event they lose or misplace their phones.” The Mobile Recovery software — which will work on Android, BlackBerry, Palm, and Windows Mobile handsets — can remote lock and remote wipe your device as well as show your phone’s position, via GPS, on a map. The service can also be used to make your phone sound an alarm (which can be especially useful for those times your phone is lost in the couch cushions). The Mobile Recovery application will be available to customers who subscribe to the Total Equipment Coverage (TEC) program that Verizon offers; the TEC service is underwritten by Asurion. Hit the read link for all the details. More →

46 Comments

Eight U.S. senators call for investigation of Huawei equipment sale to Sprint

By on August 19, 2010 at 3:37 PM.

Eight U.S. senators call for investigation of Huawei equipment sale to Sprint

The Washington Post is reporting that eight Republican U.S. senators are trying to block the sale of telecommunications equipment from Chinese manufacturer Huawei to U.S. wireless provider Sprint Nextel. The group, led by Senator Jon Kyl of Arizona, is asking the Obama administration to investigate if the country’s national security will be compromised by the equipment. In a statement, the group said, “A Chinese company with such a leading role in Iran’s economy and close relationship with the IRGC should not be able to do business in the U.S.” Pretty interesting language out of a group that heralds the wonders of the “free market.” The senators also note that Huawei sells equipment to the Chinese Military, Afghanistan, and Iraq. “At worst, Huawei’s becoming a major supplier of Sprint Nextel could present a case of a company, acting at the direction of and funded by the Chinese military, taking a critical place in the supply chain of the U.S. military, law enforcement and private sector,” said the eight senators. You get the idea… what do you think? Is Huawei equipment in the U.S. a national security risk or is this just more political gamesmanship?

Thanks, Q! More →

122 Comments