Google Allo Duo Encryption

Google Allo security explained: The good, the bad and the ugly

By on May 20, 2016 at 11:00 PM.

Google Allo security explained: The good, the bad and the ugly

Google isn’t happy with the chat apps it already has, so at I/O 2016 it showed off a new Assistant-infused Allo messaging app as well as a Duo video chat app intended to work like Apple’s FaceTime, but across platforms. From Google’s demos, you can easily see they’re incredible apps that should offer fast and smart communication. However, there are things you need to know about privacy and encryption. More →

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Ted Lieu Interview

Meet Rep. Ted Lieu, a Congressman who says encryption is a ‘national security priority’

By on April 29, 2016 at 12:27 PM.

Meet Rep. Ted Lieu, a Congressman who says encryption is a ‘national security priority’

Ted Lieu is one of the few bona fide computer geeks in Congress. Even if you didn’t already know the California Democrat is one of only four congressmen (out of a total of 535) with a computer science degree, it’s the kind of thing that quickly becomes apparent when talking to the Stanford grad about a range of privacy and encryption matters.

For starters, he recently downloaded and started using WhatsApp, the Facebook-owned messaging platform that earlier this month defaulted to end-to-end encryption for all users. He’s not only a supporter of strong encryption without backdoors — Lieu considers it “a national security priority.” More →

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Burr-Feinstein Anti-encryption Law

Experts agree: Congress’s ‘braindead’ anti-encryption bill is unspeakably bad

By on April 15, 2016 at 3:03 PM.

Experts agree: Congress’s ‘braindead’ anti-encryption bill is unspeakably bad

A few days ago, a first draft of an anti-encryption bill from Senators Richard Burr (R-NC) and Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) came to light and it drew an instant backlash from security experts. The law is apparently so bad that not only would it make the some of the NSA’s own work illegal, but it would also outlaw some of the things we’ve taken for granted for years, such as the ability to compress large files to share them online. More →

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FBI Apple San Bernardino iPhone Case

FBI bought zero-day from professional hackers to crack San Bernardino iPhone

By on April 13, 2016 at 6:50 AM.

FBI bought zero-day from professional hackers to crack San Bernardino iPhone

A zero-day software flaw is the kind of security issue tech companies fear most. These are unknown bugs that hackers can use to enter devices, websites, computer networks, and other internet services and products, for malicious purposes. It appears that one such attack was used recently to hack the San Bernardino iPhone, a new report shows. In fact, it looks like everything we thought we knew about the way the FBI breached the iPhone, without requiring Apple’s assistance, may be inaccurate. More →

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iPhone 6 Password Hack

Can the FBI already hack newer iPhones?

By on April 11, 2016 at 7:50 PM.

Can the FBI already hack newer iPhones?

Late last week we found out that the FBI can’t hack Apple’s latest iPhones. In fact, according to its director, the tool used to extract information from the San Bernardino iPhone 5c can’t be used on anything newer than the iPhone 5s. Not even the iPhone 5s which was launched simultaneously with the iPhone 5c can’t be hacked that way.

More →

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iPhone Encryption Laws USA

New bill might force Apple to hack encrypted iPhones

By on April 8, 2016 at 9:00 PM.

New bill might force Apple to hack encrypted iPhones

The FBI has abandoned its court battle with Apple for the time being, after figuring out how to hack the San Bernardino iPhone without Apple’s help. However, the fight over smartphone encryption is not over, and there’s a new proposal that seeks to regulate law enforcement’s access to encrypted devices and Internet products. More →

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Apple iPhone Unlock Police

Apple didn’t always care so much about protecting iPhone users from the government

By on April 8, 2016 at 1:05 PM.

Apple didn’t always care so much about protecting iPhone users from the government

A new report says that Apple was more willing to comply with the government in the past when it came to unlocking iPhones tied to criminal investigations, having gone as far as to help prosecutors draft the documentation that would force it to unlock a device. More →

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iPhone 6s FBI Hack

The FBI can’t hack the iPhone 6s

By on April 7, 2016 at 6:50 AM.

The FBI can’t hack the iPhone 6s

The FBI withdrew its assault on iPhone encryption after it managed to hack its way into the San Bernardino iPhone. Soon after that, the agency notified other law enforcement officials across the country that it’ll try and help out unlock other iPhones from various criminal investigations.

The FBI is yet to tell Apple how it performed the hack, but the Bureau does talk about it with senators. In the meantime, the FBI confirmed that while it may be able to hack some iPhones, the iPhone 6s is impenetrable for the time being.

More →

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How to encrypt iPhone and Android, and why you should do it now

By on April 4, 2016 at 1:50 PM.

How to encrypt iPhone and Android, and why you should do it now

Apple’s fight with the FBI may be over for the time being, but this high-profile fight about user privacy and state security may have puzzled some smartphone users. When is an iPhone or Android device encrypted? And how does one go about securing the data on them?

More →

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Apple FBI iPhone Hack Leak

Apple confident it’ll find and patch the FBI’s iPhone hack

By on April 4, 2016 at 7:15 AM.

Apple confident it’ll find and patch the FBI’s iPhone hack

Apple’s fight with the FBI over the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone isn’t over yet because now Apple has to figure out how the FBI actually hacked into the device without Apple’s help.

The FBI did not reveal to Apple how it bypassed the security protocols built into iOS, but the bureau told law enforcement agencies that it will help them in their investigations. Even if it doesn’t provide specifics about the iPhone hack at its disposal, the more iPhones the FBI unlocks for criminal cases, the more likely Apple will be able to figure out how it’s gaining access. More →

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ISIS Attack Paris Brussels iPhone Encryption

Forget iPhone encryption, the FBI can’t legally touch the software ISIS uses

By on March 31, 2016 at 5:26 PM.

Forget iPhone encryption, the FBI can’t legally touch the software ISIS uses

The FBI insists that encrypted products like the iPhone and encrypted online services will put people in harm’s way, especially in light of the ISIS-connected San Bernardino shooting late last year. That’s why the Bureau has been arguing for encryption backdoors that would be available to law enforcement agencies, and why it looked to coerce Apple to add a backdoor to iOS.

However, extensive reports that show the preparations ISIS made before hitting Paris and Brussels revealed the kind of encrypted products ISIS radicals used to stay in touch with central command. Unsurprisingly, these products are out of the FBI’s jurisdiction, and one in particular was one of the safest encrypted communication products you can find online. In fact,its original developers are suspected to have ties to the criminal underworld. More →

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Would it be any easier for the FBI to crack Android?

By on March 31, 2016 at 2:11 PM.

Would it be any easier for the FBI to crack Android?

Much has been written about the massive fight between the FBI and Apple over encryption in the high-profile San Bernardino shooting case. Apple has won the battle for the time being, though the FBI has managed to break into the phone without Apple’s help. What’s more, the Bureau will soon help hack into other iOS devices that law enforcement agencies across the country want to unlock.

Can the FBI do the same thing with Android devices? More →

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FBI Unlock iPhone Criminal Case

It has begun: The FBI will unlock other iPhones in criminal investigations

By on March 31, 2016 at 7:15 AM.

It has begun: The FBI will unlock other iPhones in criminal investigations

We were wondering whether the FBI will agree to use in other cases the same hack that unlocked the San Bernardino iPhone just earlier this week, and it turns out the agency is more than willing to share its newly acquired know-how to help other law enforcement agencies solve their on-going investigations. Just days after it confirmed it didn’t need Apple to access the local files of the iPhone 5c that belonged to one of the San Bernardino shooters, the FBI agreed to assist an Arkansas prosecutor unlock an iPhone and iPod that may contain relevant evidence to a double homicide case. More →

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