Boxee Live TV tuner to ship this week

By on January 24, 2012 at 3:35 PM.

Boxee Live TV tuner to ship this week

Boxee will begin shipping its new Boxee Live TV tuners this week according to a post on the company’s blog. The new device is a dongle that provides Boxee Box owners with the ability to watch local broadcast TV stations. The Boxee Box accessory costs just $49.99 and it is likely best for those who have turned to Boxee to replace their cable television subscription, not those who are using it as a supplement. The Boxee Live TV tuner supports the following:

  • Social Channel Listings – We’ll show you what’s on, what your friends are watching, and how many people total are watching a show as you flip through channels.
  • Sharing – Share the traditional Boxee way on Facebook, Twitter or Tumblr AND you can now passively share to Facebook using our Live TV Timeline App – turn sharing on and whatever you’re tuned into will post to your Facebook ticker automatically.  It’s easy to switch off too so your friends don’t need to know about your addiction to HSN.
  • Edit Channels - Quickly hide channels from your lineup that don’t speak your language or have pissed you off with bad programming decisions like taking Arrested Development off the air.  Easily rename WNDHCTA 7.2 to NBC.
  • All-In-One Interface – done watching a show on broadcast, easily jump into more episodes from the web. It’s the best of both worlds all on the same remote.
Those who pre-ordered the device should begin receiving their orders this week. More →
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AT&T announces first two 4G LTE devices

By on July 13, 2011 at 1:11 AM.

AT&T announces first two 4G LTE devices

AT&T on Tuesday revealed the first two 4G LTE devices that will launch on its forthcoming LTE network later this summer. The AT&T USBConnect Momentum 4G and AT&T Mobile Hotspot Elevate 4G will christen the new cellular broadband network, which is set to launch in Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Houston and San Antonio this summer before extending to at least 15 markets later this year. AT&T says 70 million Americans will be covered by its 4G LTE network before the end of 2011. Both the Momentum 4G USB modem and the Elevate 4G mobile hotspot will feature compatibility with AT&T’s HSPA+ 4G network as well, ensuring both coverage and confusion for customers across the country. “AT&T recognizes that customers want a consistent, responsive network performance from major cities to their neighborhood. Our deployment of  4G LTE technology backed by our nationwide HSPA+ network allows us to give customers a superior mobile broadband experience today and for years to come,” said AT&T Mobility SVP, Devices Jeff Bradley in a statement. “As we begin to roll out our 4G LTE network this year, AT&T customers will be able to choose from several new LTE devices, starting with the AT&T USBConnect Momentum 4G and AT&T Mobile Hotspot Elevate 4G.” The Momentum 4G will cost $49.99 and the Elevate 4G will cost $69.99, each with a 2-year data contract. AT&T’s full press release follows below. More →

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VeriFone CEO slams mobile payments startup over security concerns [video]

By on March 9, 2011 at 4:35 PM.

VeriFone CEO slams mobile payments startup over security concerns [video]

VeriFone’s CEO, Douglas G. Bergeron, has taken to the Internet to publicly voice his company’s concern with a mobile payments startup named Square. Via a YouTube video and an open letter, Bergeron explains that Square’s reader has a “serious security flaw” that “places consumers in dire risk.” Bergeron and VeriFone’s beef stems from the fact that Square’s reader does not utilize any type of hardware encryption schema when scanning cards. What does this mean? If you were to use a VeriFone card scanner, the information scanned off of a credit card’s magnetic stripe would be encrypted, stored, and transmitted to the desired payment agency for processing. Square’s scanners attach to the 3.5mm audio jack of an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, and scan/store the read credit card information in plain text — making it later viewable by a person(s) running a skimming scam. More →

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Verizon Wireless LTE modem now supports Apple computers

By on February 1, 2011 at 11:38 PM.

Verizon Wireless LTE modem now supports Apple computers

Verizon Wireless on Tuesday updated its “VZAccess Manager” software to add Mac support for the Pantech UML290 LTE modem. The new update — VZAccess Manager version 7.2.4 (2534b) — adds support for Apple computers running OS X 10.4 and later. Pantech’s UML290 is a USB dongle that allows laptops to connect to Verizon’s 4G LTE network. Until now, the broadband modem could only be connected to Windows-based computers. The new software is available immediately from Verizon’s website as a free download. The carrier’s other 4G LTE modem, the LG VL600, does not yet support Mac computers. More →

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Throwback Thursday: PCMCIA Network Interface Cards

By on December 9, 2010 at 4:58 PM.

Throwback Thursday: PCMCIA Network Interface Cards

Let’s take a trip down Memory Lane to the late-90′s. Back to a much simpler time when cheap gas, overinflated technology stocks, and unattractive computer hardware (and haircuts) reigned supreme. If, during this time, you happened to be the proud owner of a frumpy laptop (unattractive haircut optional), there is a good chance you had a certain connectivity peripheral protruding from the side of your machine… a PCMCIA network interface card (NIC).

PCMCIA stood for Personal Computer Memory Card International Association, which was the name of the group that governed the cards standards. PCMCIA NICs adhering to the standard had a dual-row 68-pin configuration, were 54mm wide, and came in a variety of thicknesses — depending on which type of card you had (Type I, II, and III were the most common).

The PCMCIA NIC card was a standard after market accessory for laptops in the late 90′s. If you were interested in using your portable computer on the Internet with that new-fangled “ethernet” technology you were going to need one of these bad boys as ethernet ports were still not standard on laptops at this time. Often accompanied by a dongle, the PCMCIA ethernet adapter provided users high-speed connectivity in a dial-up world. 3Com and Xircom were two of the major PCMCIA manufacturers.

The general consensus around the BGR office is that these cards were one of the least reliable pieces of hardware one could own. Jonathan, Zach, and myself can all recount buying, returning, and exchanging, multiple PCMCIA NIC cards due to various hardware failures, driver issues, and software incompatibilities. But, at that time, they were a necessary evil.

What say you? Can you remember the days of yore when ethernet was a privilege and a bent pin or lost dongle could totally ruin your day? More →

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AT&T to carry the Nokia Internet Stick CS-12?

By on March 17, 2010 at 12:22 PM.

AT&T to carry the Nokia Internet Stick CS-12?

nokia-cs-12-internet-stick-fcc

We haven’t heard anything about this from our connects at either AT&T or Nokia, but a filing made available two days ago by the FCC has us believing that AT&T might be planning on offering up the Internet Stick CS-12. Featuring all of the appropriate GSM and WCDMA bands needed to function on AT&T, the CS-12 is capable of supporting downlink speeds of up to 14.4Mbps and uplink speeds of 5.56Mbps. Of course, AT&T’s network is in no way capable of getting anywhere near those speeds — with most markets still stick in a hellish 3.6Mbps nightmare — as the slow rollout of 7.2Mbps continues. Perhaps this new stick has something to do with Ralph de la Vega’s recent talk of  “certain locations” getting access to a 21Mbps HSPA+ network on the way to LTE. More →

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MagicJack sues BoingBoing, loses the case and its credibilty

By on February 24, 2010 at 2:37 PM.

MagicJack sues BoingBoing, loses the case and its credibilty

magicjack

MagicJack, creator and distributor of the popular dongle-based PC VoIP solution, has some problems with its credibility. Back in 2008, BoingBoing revealed some of the companies disingenuous business practices which include but are not limited to: a fake visitor counter on its website that increased automatically on its own, a bogus MagicJack detection page that claims a functioning MagicJack device is connected when none is present, and serious problems with its EULA that allows the service to screen calls and send targeted ads to users while also forcing users to waive their rights to sue in court. Rather than acknowledge its culpability and change its practices, MagicJack dragged BoingBoing into court with a charge of defamation. When it was shown that the BoingBoing article was not defaming, the case was dismissed and MagicJack was ordered to pay $50,000 in legal costs to BoingBoing. Rather than accept the penalty and move on, MagicJack CEO Dan Borislow blamed the incompetence of his lawyers for the loss and tried to buy BoingBoing’s silence by offering the online news site a settlement if the contents of the lawsuit and settlement were kept private. BoingBoing refused to be silenced and now the lawsuit, its outcome, and MagicJack’s futile attempt to cover its tracks are exposed for the world to see.

[Via TechDirt] More →

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Verizon launches USB1000 global USB modem

By on June 18, 2009 at 2:58 PM.

Verizon launches USB1000 global USB modem

While light mobile broadband users are busy eying Virgin Mobile’s new prepaid offering, those of you who travel constantly might be interested in Verizon Wireless’ latest USB stick. Dubbed the USB1000, Big Red’s new mobile broadband dongle packs all the connectivity you can handle — CDMA/EV-DO Rev. A, GSM/GPRS/EDGE and tri-band HSPA are all accounted for. As for pricing, the stick itself will run $149.99 after a $50 mail-in rebate. Global data plans on the other hand, are a bit less attractive: $129.99 per month for 100MB of data and $219.99 per month for 200MB. Both plans will run you $0.005 per KB over the allotment and they include 5GB of data in the US and Canada ($0.05 per MB overage). You can also opt for the standard 5GB/$60 plan and pay $0.002 per KB in Canada, $0.005 per KB in Mexico, and $0.02 per KB for international roaming in over 175 other countries. If you’re a true international man of mystery, you should be able to warrant the expense of VZW’s global plans. Occasional travelers on the other hand, might be wise to examine other options. The USB1000 will be available online starting tomorrow.

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Images of Virgin Mobile broadband USB modem found on Best Buy servers

By on June 9, 2009 at 3:28 PM.

Images of Virgin Mobile broadband USB modem found on Best Buy servers

Patience Virgin Mobile subscribers, patience. Last month we scooped an upcoming mobile broadband offering from Virgin Mobile that is slowly but surely making its way to Best Buy Mobile. Shortly thereafter, we scared up some possible details as far as pricing and data cost are concerned. Well folks, it looks like we might be getting closer to launch time as one of our readers tossed on his mining hat and managed to dig up some dirt. Found camping out on a Best Buy image server, two images of an upcoming Virgin Mobile USB modem sit ready and waiting. We’ve verified their presence on Best Buy’s servers and the item numbers match so you’re indeed looking at what will be VM’s first mobile broadband accessory here in the US. To refresh your memory, Virgin Mobile will supposedly offer both prepaid and postpaid mobile broadband packages and the modem will run $150. Hit the jump for one more shot.

Thanks, Andrew!

More →

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T-Mobile launches 3G webConnect Laptop Stick

By on March 25, 2009 at 12:38 AM.

T-Mobile launches 3G webConnect Laptop Stick

It took a while, but it’s finally here: T-Mobile has announced the launch of the 3G webConnect laptop USB stick. While other carriers have already been offering similar products for quite some time, T-Mobile users can enjoy 3G speeds with one from their very own carrier. Of course, we all know that T-Mobile’s 3G footprint is young and rather small, but the USB stick is compatible with EDGE if you can handle those speeds. The webConnect stick can be had for $49.99 with a 2-year contract, or $99.99 with a 1-year contract, and if you’d like to pay month-to-month without contracts, it’s $249.99. Quite pricey, if you ask us. Like other carriers, there is a 5GB limit per month for $59.99 a month. The USB stick also allows you to connect to 802.11b/g WiFi hotspots and doubles as a memory stick with an 8GB capacity. If mobility is critical to you and WiFi isn’t always available, it might not be a bad option.

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