Throwback Thursday: IBM

By on June 16, 2011 at 3:45 PM.

Throwback Thursday: IBM

BGR’s Throwback Thursday segment is typically reserved for extinct tech, but this week we make an exception. On June 16th, 1911 — one hundred years ago today — Charles Ranlett Flint merged three companies to form the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company. Headquartered in New York City, CTR manufactured and sold scales, card-punch machines, meat slicers and a variety of other products that have long since been replaced by several generations of improved offerings. CTR changed its name to International Business Machines Corporation, or IBM, on February 14th, 1924, to better align its name with its wide range of products. IBM would hit its stride building tabulating devices, and it was at the forefront of developing the PCs we now take for granted. Now, 100 years later with a market capitalization of just under $200 billion, IBM remains a leader in the technology space, producing software and hardware that will shape the future of computing. Happy 100th, IBM, and here’s to 100 more.

BGR’s Throwback Thursday is a weekly series covering our (and your) favorite gadgets, games, and software of yesterday and yesteryear.

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Apple iPhone developer boasts: $1,400 in revenue from iAds in one day

By on July 8, 2010 at 2:48 PM.

Apple iPhone developer boasts: $1,400 in revenue from iAds in one day

iAd day one

iPhone developer Jason Ting has a hot app. He is the first to market with an application that will activate the iPhone 4′s built in LED camera flash, turning your smartphone into a flashlight. Now, while the flashlight application itself isn’t all that exciting (although it was downloaded over 9,000 times in one day) this next bit of news is. Ting boasts that he grossed just under $1,400 on 9,300 ad impressions with a 11.8% click-through rate. Fourteen hundred dollars in one day!? Yikes. The high click-through rate can partially be credited to iPhone users who were curious about the new iAds system; clicking through to see how the system worked. Whatever the reason, Ting has an extra $1,400 in his pocket. More →

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