Sprint and C Spire postpone AT&T merger lawsuits

By on December 13, 2011 at 10:00 PM.

Sprint and C Spire postpone AT&T merger lawsuits

Sprint and C Spire Wireless have decided to postpone lawsuits levied against AT&T. The two carriers had originally filed the suits in hopes of blocking AT&T’s planned  $39 billion acquisition of T-Mobile USA from Deutsche Telekom. AT&T recently pulled its merger application from the FCC however, and was granted a stay until January 18th for its lawsuit against the Department of Justice. Sprint originally sued to block the merger in September when it argued the deal would “harm retail consumers and corporate customers by causing higher prices and less innovation.” More →

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AT&T asks Sprint to disclose competition plans pending outcome of planned merger

By on November 3, 2011 at 8:30 PM.

AT&T asks Sprint to disclose competition plans pending outcome of planned merger

AT&T recently requested that a federal judge push Sprint to reveal what its plans for competition will be pending the outcome of AT&T’s planned acquisition of T-Mobile USA. Sprint has been a staunch opponent of the deal and it is clear that AT&T has at least some worry Sprint may try to team up with T-Mobile should the purchase be denied. “Sprint is a strong and vibrant competitor as evidenced by events in the past six months — a fact that is critical to AT&T’s defense of DOJ’s claim that the challenged merger will dampen competition in the mobile wireless industry,” AT&T attorney Steven Benz, who is an employee of Kellogg, Huber, Hansen, Todd, Evans & Figel PLLC, said. In addition to AT&T’s request, U.S. District Judge Ellen Huvelle recently allowed Sprint and C Spire Wireless to move forward with lawsuits that were filed in opposition of AT&T’s planned merger. AT&T recently asked Huvelle to toss the lawsuit and argued that “Sprint cannot wrap itself in the cloak of wireless service consumers’ interest because Sprint is not a consumer but instead a competitor in the sale of wireless services.” Huvelle disagrees. “Where private plaintiffs have successfully pleaded antitrust injury, the fact that they are defendants’ competitors is no bar” to filing a suit, Huvelle explained. “We believe the limited, minor claims [Sprint and C Spire Wireless] have left are entirely without merit,” AT&T senior executive vice president and general counsel Wayne Watts told Reuters. More →

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