New website answers the question on all our minds: Has Sony been hacked this week?

By on June 13, 2011 at 11:45 AM.

New website answers the question on all our minds: Has Sony been hacked this week?

BGR has provided extensive coverage of an ongoing saga that has seen numerous digital properties belonging to Sony fall under attack. To date, personal information belonging to well over 100 million Sony customers has been compromised, and nearly 13 million credit card numbers have been stolen. For IT professionals or other tech enthusiasts with weak stomachs, we can understand if reading one story after another about Sony’s security woes might make you a bit queasy. As such, a new site launched recently that has you covered. Hassonybeenhackedthisweek.com answers a single question for those who simply want to cut to the chase: Has Sony been hacked this week? The answer right now, by the way, is “yes.” More →

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Hotmail begins offering email aliases to curb spam

By on February 4, 2011 at 11:32 PM.

Hotmail begins offering email aliases to curb spam

In a recent blog post, Microsoft announced a new feature aimed at keeping spam away from the inboxes of its Hotmail user-base. Currently, Hotmail users are allowed to modify their email addresses with a plus-sign (+) to facilitate easier mail management. John-doe@hotmail.com can modify his email address to john.doe+blogcomments@hotmail.com to help make mail organization and identification easier. The problem with that system, as Microsoft points out, is that it is “very easy to determine your actual email address” pointing out “there are times when you simply don’t want to give out any part of your real email address.” To solve this problem, the company is now allowing users to create email aliases; addresses that are not required to have any portion of the senders actual email address included in them. Not a bad feature addition considering how some companies like to, on occasion, share your information with each other. Hit the read link to check out the full article. More →

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Google rolls out ‘restore contacts’ feature to Gmail users

By on December 15, 2010 at 2:22 AM.

Google rolls out ‘restore contacts’ feature to Gmail users

If you’ve ever accidentally deleted a contact from your Gmail address book, you know what pain is. The action has been, since the inception of the contacts feature, irreversible. But that all changes today. Google has announced a new “restore contacts” feature that will grant those whom have accidentally deleted a contact 30-days of clemency. As the press release reads:

We’ve added a new feature to Google Contacts that allows you to revert your contact list and undo any mistakes made up to 30 days in the past. Let’s say you accidentally deleted a bunch of contacts or wiped the contact data from your Gmail account by mistake while syncing to another device. Visit Gmail’s Contacts section, select “Restore contacts” in the “More actions” menu, and choose the time you would like to revert to.

The feature is rolling out to Gmail users as we type. More →

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IP addresses in short supply, 234.3 million version 4 IPs left

By on July 23, 2010 at 6:41 AM.

IP addresses in short supply, 234.3 million version 4 IPs left

Cisco Router

The Internet is going to run out of IP addresses in one year. That is what John Curran, President and CEO of the American Registry for Internet Numbers, and Vint Cerf, Google’s Chief Internet Evangelist, are saying. The 32-bit IPv4 system currently in use is limited to just over 4 billion unique addresses. With the explosion of mobile devices, internet aware products, and 4G integrated technologies the IPv4 system has a mere 234.37 million addresses left for allocation. The next generation IP address protocol — IPv6 — is a full 128-bits, and has enough allocatable addresses to provide “every person on the planet [with] over 4 billion addresses.” The move to IPv6 has been slow, however larger companies like Google and Facebook have already started implementing the new protocol. Some companies are claiming this impending IPcalypse is merely the next Y2K type scare, and 10 years from now we will still be using IPv4. What do you think? Hit the jump to watch Google’s Vint Cerf — a man who, to us, looks like The Architect from The Matrix — explain why he is concerned. More →

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