Google’s Nexus tablet may push Android partners out of the picture

Google’s Nexus tablet may push Android partners out of the picture

By on January 5, 2012 at 10:35 AM.

Media tablets powered by Google’s Android operating system have for the most part been unable to capture consumers’ interest. With just a few exceptions, sales of individual Android tablet models have been extremely low by all accounts. Amazon’s new Kindle Fire is one such exception thanks to an attractive price point and tight integration with Amazon services. Google has seemingly taken note of Amazon’s success, and a new report suggests the company is working on a budget-priced slate of its own that will launch in the next few months. Read on for more. More →

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Apple takes patent attacks in a new direction

Apple takes patent attacks in a new direction

By on December 20, 2011 at 10:01 AM.

Apple’s aggressive patent strategy has hit a few speed bumps lately. The Cupertino, California-based company won an injunction on sales of Samsung’s Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Australia, but the ban was recently overturned. A German court then sided with Motorola in a retaliatory lawsuit, ordering an injunction on Apple’s iPhone and iPad, and declaring that European Apple subsidiary Apple Sales International pay damages related to the infringement. Finally, earlier this week, the U.S. International Trade Commission ruled that HTC devices were not infringing on three Apple-owned patents. The ITC determined that a number of HTC devices did infringe on one Apple patent, but the Taiwan-based vendor already made it clear that a simple change will allow it to avoid the related injunction. Apropos, Apple’s legal team has decided to expand its efforts beyond patents covering technology integral to the function of its mobile products. Now, it will also attack competitors over their smartphone and tablet cases. Read on for more. More →

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Apple is trying to make iOS autocorrect less horrible

Apple is trying to make iOS autocorrect less horrible

By on November 10, 2011 at 10:00 AM.

Apple is working on solutions that will help to improve the text input experience on its iOS devices. The Cupertino, California-based company has been discovered to be building an enhanced version of its autocorrect feature, the beginnings of which are currently hidden within the publicly available version of iOS 5, that adds suggested words above the iOS keyboard as users type. The functionality works much like the solutions currently found in Android or Microsoft’s Windows Phone platform, and it is viewed by many as a much-needed addition to Apple’s mobile OS. Read on for more. More →

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Android, Windows Phone seen benefitting from ‘disappointing’ iPhone 4S

Android, Windows Phone seen benefitting from ‘disappointing’ iPhone 4S

By on October 6, 2011 at 11:45 AM.

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: calling the future best-selling smartphone in the world “disappointing” is a bit of a reach. DigiTimes’ infamous anonymous industry sources are running with it, however, and they think smartphone vendors that sell Android and Windows Phone-powered handsets will benefit from the opportunity Apple’s new iPhone will afford them. “The newly released iPhone 4S lags behind some mainstream smartphones as far as specifications are concerned,” the site’s sources said, because we all know how concerned the everyman is with specs. Companies like HTC, Samsung and Nokia, the sources continued, now have a chance to “expand their market shares with innovative models.” Read on for more. More →

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Apple’s rise to greatness

Apple’s rise to greatness

By on October 5, 2011 at 12:45 PM.

People are disappointed. What else can I say? With all of the hype, and even our own reporting, Apple should have released a real iPhone 5. But it didn’t, and the fact that Apple is releasing the same exact model with internal upgrades is upsetting to a lot of people. You know what, though? The overwhelming majority of people probably couldn’t care less. More →

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Apple’s fall from grace

Apple’s fall from grace

By on October 5, 2011 at 10:35 AM.

Apple was a company that could do no wrong. Phones that dropped every other call… Location tracking scandals… Antennagate… A CEO who constantly parked his $130,000 sports car diagonally in handicapped spaces… Apple didn’t have to roll with the punches, the company would simply laugh at the punches or toss the press and public a few crumbs if need be. A week or even a day later, all was forgiven and Apple would continue on its path, making terrific products and mopping up industry profits while whistling to itself contently. More →

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If Apple introduces an iPhone 4S, it’s probably not going to just be a new iPhone 4

If Apple introduces an iPhone 4S, it’s probably not going to just be a new iPhone 4

By on October 3, 2011 at 11:12 AM.

While expectations were high for a brand new tear drop-shaped iPhone 5 with larger display, insanely thin design, and more, it’s looking like Apple might be set to introduce an upgraded iPhone 4 instead. Bummer, right? Well… if and when Apple does introduce the iPhone 4S (which is most likely what it will be called), I’m anticipating some changes that make the device stand out from the model before it, the iPhone 4. Hit the break for my thoughts. More →

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Apple is unveiling two new iPhones next month, and here’s why

Apple is unveiling two new iPhones next month, and here’s why

By on September 21, 2011 at 4:25 PM.

So… I have been thinking about this a lot lately (as has anyone in this industry), and basically no one has any clue what Apple is releasing as far as smartphones go this year. While there have been credible leaks and reports, Apple has played a masterful chess game confusing not only its competitors but the tech press as well. One leak contradicts another report, one mainstream publication contradicts another mainstream publication, one analyst note contradicts another’s research note. Let’s break this down logically, together. Apple has an iPhone 4 that is over a year old and is still the best-selling smartphone in the world. In fact, it’s still the best-selling smartphone on practically every carrier in the world that sells it. Apple could easily update it with the company’s A5 processor and an 8-megapixel camera, but is Apple really going to break from its traditional summertime release schedule just to dump in a new CPU and camera? What’s the point? Read on for more.

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Sorry Apple, Windows 8 ushers in the post-post-PC era

Sorry Apple, Windows 8 ushers in the post-post-PC era

By on September 13, 2011 at 3:25 PM.

Microsoft executives took to the stage at the annual BUILD developer conference on Tuesday to give the world its first real look at the future of the Windows operating system. The reception, as you’ve likely read by now, has been overwhelmingly positive. In fact, Apple bloggers were apparently so flustered by the platform that they resorted to bombarding Twitter with jokes about cooling fans and Silverlight instead of stopping for a moment to realize that Microsoft is showing us the future of computing. The PC was the future, and it let people perform functions they never thought possible. Then the tablet was the future, and it let people interact with content in ways they never thought possible. Now, the future means all things to all people. Read on for more. More →

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‘Other designs are possible’

‘Other designs are possible’

By on September 12, 2011 at 10:10 AM.

Apple and Samsung are at odds over patents. You might have read about it. In numerous courts, in numerous states, in numerous countries on numerous continents, the pair continue to file complaint after complaint. Apple says Samsung builds copycat devices that steal design elements from its iPad tablet and iPhone smartphone. Samsung says Apple’s mobile devices violate multiple Samsung patents covering communications standards. And round and round we go. More →

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Google's Motorola buy could spell trouble for Android partners

Google's Motorola buy could spell trouble for Android partners

By on August 15, 2011 at 1:01 PM.

By now, you’ve no doubt seen the news: Google intends to acquire Motorola Mobility for $12.5 billion. What this will do is not only give Google access to Motorola’s vast patent library consisting of nearly 25,000 patents, but it will also give Google an end-to-end hardware and software strategy with smartphones, tablets and even with Google TV. The thing is, Google didn’t need to buy Motorola. Google could have just licensed the patents from Motorola. Google bought Motorola because it felt like control of the Android experience was slipping away. It’s apparent that one Nexus-like device from Google a year won’t be enough — MOTOBLUR has probably given Andy Rubin ulcers — and it’s apparent that a company that’s leading in many areas of the smartphone arena wants to control that entire experience. Open or not, it is Google’s, after all. Smartphones and tablets are also going to be the biggest categories in technology for the foreseeable future, and if you think Google is just going to play around with that, well, you obviously haven’t seen the company’s recent moves. Read on for more. More →

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Google and Microsoft's public patent spat gets louder, sadder

Google and Microsoft's public patent spat gets louder, sadder

By on August 4, 2011 at 5:30 PM.

Microsoft’s Communications boss Frank X. Shaw on Thursday responded to an update posted by Google’s Chief Legal Officer David Drummond, which was written in response to Microsoft’s General Counsel Brad Smith’s response to Drummond’s initial claim that Microsoft and Apple were playing dirty with patents. Catch all that? Here’s the gist of it: Google’s David Drummond wrote on Wednesday that Microsoft, Apple and others were “banding together to acquire Novell’s old patents (the ‘CPTN’ group including Microsoft and Apple) and Nortel’s old patents (the ‘Rockstar’ group including Microsoft and Apple), to make sure Google didn’t get them.” Microsoft’s Frank X. Shaw and Brad Smith each responded on Twitter, saying that Google was invited to the patent party but the company declined the invitation. On Thursday, Drummond updated his original post on the Google blog, stating that Microsoft and Apple’s invitation was disingenuous. Had Google joined the group that purchased the patents, Drummond explained, the joint acquisition would have “eliminated any protection these patents could offer to Android against attacks from Microsoft and its bidding partners.”

Microsoft’s Shaw then shot back on Twitter, saying that Drummond is a liar and Google didn’t joint the group because it wanted the patents all to itself (of course Google’s bids in the Nortel patent auction were seemingly intended to merely drive up the price of the portfolio; it bid $Pi billion at one point). The bottom line is it’s all ridiculous, and each company is out to protect its own interests as can only be expected. It would be great if tech giants could fire all their patent attorneys and build innovative products without having to weave through an obstacle course of patents, but that will never happen under the current system. In the meantime, companies will keep suing each other and in the end, everyone — including end users — loses.

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