Tesla sold more than 50,000 Model S sedans in 2015, a new annual record

Tesla Model S Sales 2015Image Source: Maurizio Pesce

Despite overblown reliability issues drummed up by Consumer Reports, Tesla during the last quarter of 2015 managed to deliver more Model S vehicles than ever before. Over the weekend, the company quietly issued a press release announcing that it delivered 17,400 Model S sedans to customers over the past three months, setting an all-time quarterly record in the process.

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To put that figure into perspective, the number of Model S deliveries in Q4 of 2015 represents a 75% increase compared to the same quarter a year-ago. What’s more, Tesla completely smashed its previous delivery record (11,574 set during Q3 2015) by an incredible 50%.

For the entirety of 2015, Tesla delivered 50,580 cars, an impressive figure that just managed to surpass the low-range of Tesla’s delivery projection of 50,000 to 55,000 vehicles. By way of contrast, Tesla’s previous annual delivery record, set in 2014, checked in at 33,157 units. All told, Tesla deliveries year over year increased by 52%, a striking figure given that some analysts have been quick to proclaim that anyone who already wants a Tesla likely already owns one.

Looking ahead, Tesla seems well-positioned to set new delivery records across 2016. Not only are electric vehicles gaining more acceptance across the mainstream, but the recently released Model X will undoubtedly help bolster overall sales once production begins to ramp up. As a point of interest, the Model X, which is still backlogged, only accounted for 208 deliveries over the past quarter.

As a final point, it’s worth noting that the figures cited by Tesla only account for sedans that were actually delivered to consumers, which is to say that the total number of Model S and Model X orders may, in fact, be much higher.

Tesla’s full press release reads as follows:

tesla model s press release sales

Source:
Marketwired
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