Apple adjusts section 3.2.2 of developer agreement again

App Store Logo

You may not be an Apple developer, but that doesn’t mean you aren’t familiar with section 3.2.2 of their developer agreement. The controversial section is the sharp end of the legal stick that prevents third-party “interpreted code” from being used in applications that will be sold in the App Store. Apple has again tweaked section 3.2.2 of the agreement, adding in a loophole which will allow them to approve certain interpretive code tools. The old section 3.2.2 read like this:

No interpreted code may be downloaded or used in an Application except for code that is interpreted and run by Apple’s Documented APIs and built-in interpreter(s).

While the updated version looks like this:

Unless otherwise approved by Apple in writing, no interpreted code may be downloaded or used in an Application except for code that is interpreted and run by Apple’s Documented APIs and built-in interpreter(s). Notwithstanding the foregoing, with Apple’s prior written consent, an Application may use embedded interpreted code in a limited way if such use is solely for providing minor features or functionality that are consistent with the intended and advertised purpose of the Application.

As Apple Outsider points out, the new verbiage provides wiggle room for interpretive code engines such as Lua — used by game developers — while preserving Apple’s ability to shutter other platforms it deems unworthy *cough*Flash*cough*. Any Apple developers out there? We’re interested to know what you think.

Read

blog comments powered by Disqus